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Title: Resolving Turbine Degradation

Abstract

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton Cycle has gained significant attention in the last decade as an advanced power cycle capable of achieving high efficiency power conversion. Sandia National Laboratories, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (US DOE-NE), has been conducting research and development in order to deliver a technology that is ready for commercialization. Root cause analysis has been performed on the Recompression Loop at Sandia National Laboratories. It was found that particles throughout the loop are stainless steel, likely alloy 316 based upon the elemental composition. Deployment of a filter scheme is underway to both protect the turbomachinery and also for purposes of determining the specific cause for the particulate. Shake down tests of electric resistance (ER) as a potential in-situ monitoring scheme shows promise in high temperature systems. A modified instrument was purchased and held at 650°C for more than 1.5 months to date without issue. Quantitative measurements of this instrument will be benchmarked against witness samples in the future, but all qualitative trends to date are as to be expected. ER is a robust method for corrosion monitoring, but very slow at responding and can take several weeks under conditionsmore » to see obvious changes in behavior. Electrochemical noise was identified as an advanced technique that should be pursued for the ability to identify transients that would lead to poor material performance.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Nuclear Reactor Technologies (NE-7)
OSTI Identifier:
1374697
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-8300R
655961
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Walker, Matthew, Kruizenga, Alan Michael, and Withey, Elizabeth Ann. Resolving Turbine Degradation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1374697.
Walker, Matthew, Kruizenga, Alan Michael, & Withey, Elizabeth Ann. Resolving Turbine Degradation. United States. doi:10.2172/1374697.
Walker, Matthew, Kruizenga, Alan Michael, and Withey, Elizabeth Ann. Tue . "Resolving Turbine Degradation". United States. doi:10.2172/1374697. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1374697.
@article{osti_1374697,
title = {Resolving Turbine Degradation},
author = {Walker, Matthew and Kruizenga, Alan Michael and Withey, Elizabeth Ann},
abstractNote = {The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton Cycle has gained significant attention in the last decade as an advanced power cycle capable of achieving high efficiency power conversion. Sandia National Laboratories, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (US DOE-NE), has been conducting research and development in order to deliver a technology that is ready for commercialization. Root cause analysis has been performed on the Recompression Loop at Sandia National Laboratories. It was found that particles throughout the loop are stainless steel, likely alloy 316 based upon the elemental composition. Deployment of a filter scheme is underway to both protect the turbomachinery and also for purposes of determining the specific cause for the particulate. Shake down tests of electric resistance (ER) as a potential in-situ monitoring scheme shows promise in high temperature systems. A modified instrument was purchased and held at 650°C for more than 1.5 months to date without issue. Quantitative measurements of this instrument will be benchmarked against witness samples in the future, but all qualitative trends to date are as to be expected. ER is a robust method for corrosion monitoring, but very slow at responding and can take several weeks under conditions to see obvious changes in behavior. Electrochemical noise was identified as an advanced technique that should be pursued for the ability to identify transients that would lead to poor material performance.},
doi = {10.2172/1374697},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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