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Title: The POTRA domains of Toc75 exhibit chaperone-like function to facilitate import into chloroplasts

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - BASIC ENERGY SCIENCESNIGMS
OSTI Identifier:
1374635
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 24
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

O’Neil, Patrick K., Richardson, Lynn G. L., Paila, Yamuna D., Piszczek, Grzegorz, Chakravarthy, Srinivas, Noinaj, Nicholas, and Schnell, Danny. The POTRA domains of Toc75 exhibit chaperone-like function to facilitate import into chloroplasts. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1621179114.
O’Neil, Patrick K., Richardson, Lynn G. L., Paila, Yamuna D., Piszczek, Grzegorz, Chakravarthy, Srinivas, Noinaj, Nicholas, & Schnell, Danny. The POTRA domains of Toc75 exhibit chaperone-like function to facilitate import into chloroplasts. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1621179114.
O’Neil, Patrick K., Richardson, Lynn G. L., Paila, Yamuna D., Piszczek, Grzegorz, Chakravarthy, Srinivas, Noinaj, Nicholas, and Schnell, Danny. Tue . "The POTRA domains of Toc75 exhibit chaperone-like function to facilitate import into chloroplasts". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1621179114.
@article{osti_1374635,
title = {The POTRA domains of Toc75 exhibit chaperone-like function to facilitate import into chloroplasts},
author = {O’Neil, Patrick K. and Richardson, Lynn G. L. and Paila, Yamuna D. and Piszczek, Grzegorz and Chakravarthy, Srinivas and Noinaj, Nicholas and Schnell, Danny},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1621179114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 24,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Protein import into chloroplasts is an energy-requiring process mediated by a pertinacious import apparatus. Although previous work has shown that low levels of ATP or GTP can support precursor binding, the role of GTP during the import process remains unclear. Specifically, it is unknown whether GTP plays a separate role from ATP during the early stages of protein import and whether GTP has any role in the later stages of transport. The authors investigated the role of GTP during the various stages of protein import into chloroplasts by using purified GTP analogs and an in vitro import assay. GTP, GDP,more » the nonhydrolyzable analog GMP-PNP, and the slowly hydrolyzable analogs guanosine 5{prime}-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) and guanosine 5{prime}-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) were used in this study. Chromatographically purified 5{prime}-guanylyl-imido-diphosphate and guanosine 5{prime}-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) were found to inhibit the formation of early-import intermediates, even in the presence of ATP. The authors also observed that GTP does not play a role during the translocation of precursors from the intermediate state. They conclude that GTP hydrolysis influences events leading to the formation of early-import intermediates, but not subsequent steps such as precursor translocation.« less
  • Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperonesmore » that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post-synthetic acetylation for the chaperone function of HMGB1 protein. The presence of an acetyl groups at Lys 2 decreases strongly the stimulating effect of the protein in the stepwise salt dialysis experiment and the same tendency persisted in the dialysis free experiment.« less
  • As part of an ongoing effort to understand aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity in mink, cDNAs encoding for CYP1A1 and the CYP1A2 mixed function monooxygenases were cloned and characterized. In addition, the effects of selected dibenzofurans on the expression of these genes and the presence of their respective proteins (P4501A) were investigated, and then correlated with the catalytic activities of these proteins as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) activities. The predicted protein sequences for CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 comprise 517 and 512 amino acid residues, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis of the mink CYP1As with protein sequencesmore » of other mammals revealed high sequence homology with sea otter, seals and the dog, with amino acid identities ranging from 89 to 95% for CYP1A1 and 81 to 93% for CYP1A2. Since exposure to both 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) and 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) resulted in dose-dependent increases of CYP1A1 mRNA, CYP1A2 mRNA and CYP1A protein levels an underlying AhR-mediated mechanism is suggested. The up-regulation of CYP1A mRNA in liver was more consistent to the sum adipose TEQ concentration than to the liver TEQ concentration in minks treated with TCDF or PeCDF. The result suggested that the hepatic-sequestered fraction of PeCDF was biologically inactive to the induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2.« less
  • The authors have transcribed mRNA from a cDNA clone coding for pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, translated the mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system, and studied the energy requirement for posttranslational import of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled protein into the stroma of pea chloroplasts. They found that import depends on ATP hydrolysis within the stroma. Import is not inhibited when H/sup +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, or divalent cation gradients across the chloroplast membranes are dissipated by ionophores, as long as exogenously added ATP is also present during the import reaction. The data suggest that protein import into the chloroplast stroma requiresmore » a chloroplast ATPase that does not function to generate a membrane potential for driving the import reaction but that exerts its effect in another, yet-to-be-determined, mode. They have carried out a preliminary characterization of this ATPase regarding its nucleotide specificity and the effects of various ATPase inhibitors.« less