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Title: Structural Analysis of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain in Complex with Triamcinolone Acetonide and a Fragment of the Atypical Coregulator, Small Heterodimer Partner

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1374616
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Molecular Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Weikum, Emily R., Okafor, C. Denise, D’Agostino, Emma H., Colucci, Jennifer K., and Ortlund, Eric A.. Structural Analysis of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain in Complex with Triamcinolone Acetonide and a Fragment of the Atypical Coregulator, Small Heterodimer Partner. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1124/mol.117.108506.
Weikum, Emily R., Okafor, C. Denise, D’Agostino, Emma H., Colucci, Jennifer K., & Ortlund, Eric A.. Structural Analysis of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain in Complex with Triamcinolone Acetonide and a Fragment of the Atypical Coregulator, Small Heterodimer Partner. United States. doi:10.1124/mol.117.108506.
Weikum, Emily R., Okafor, C. Denise, D’Agostino, Emma H., Colucci, Jennifer K., and Ortlund, Eric A.. Mon . "Structural Analysis of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain in Complex with Triamcinolone Acetonide and a Fragment of the Atypical Coregulator, Small Heterodimer Partner". United States. doi:10.1124/mol.117.108506.
@article{osti_1374616,
title = {Structural Analysis of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain in Complex with Triamcinolone Acetonide and a Fragment of the Atypical Coregulator, Small Heterodimer Partner},
author = {Weikum, Emily R. and Okafor, C. Denise and D’Agostino, Emma H. and Colucci, Jennifer K. and Ortlund, Eric A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1124/mol.117.108506},
journal = {Molecular Pharmacology},
number = 1,
volume = 92,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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