skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Bragg coherent diffractive imaging of single-grain defect dynamics in polycrystalline films

Abstract

Polycrystalline material properties depend on the distribution and interactions of their crystalline grains. In particular, grain boundaries and defects are crucial in determining their response to external stimuli. A long-standing challenge is thus to observe individual grains, defects, and strain dynamics inside functional materials. Here we report a technique capable of revealing grain heterogeneity, including strain fields and individual dislocations, that can be used under operando conditions in reactive environments: grain Bragg coherent diffractive imaging (gBCDI). Using a polycrystalline gold thin film subjected to heating, we show how gBCDI resolves grain boundary and dislocation dynamics in individual grains in three-dimensional detail with 10-nanometer spatial and subangstrom displacement field resolution. Finally, these results pave the way for understanding polycrystalline material response under external stimuli and, ideally, engineering particular functions.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division; Midwest Integrated Center for Computational Materials (MICCoM); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1374598
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 356; Journal Issue: 6339; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Yau, Allison, Cha, Wonsuk, Kanan, Matthew W., Stephenson, G. Brian, and Ulvestad, Andrew. Bragg coherent diffractive imaging of single-grain defect dynamics in polycrystalline films. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aam6168.
Yau, Allison, Cha, Wonsuk, Kanan, Matthew W., Stephenson, G. Brian, & Ulvestad, Andrew. Bragg coherent diffractive imaging of single-grain defect dynamics in polycrystalline films. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aam6168.
Yau, Allison, Cha, Wonsuk, Kanan, Matthew W., Stephenson, G. Brian, and Ulvestad, Andrew. Fri . "Bragg coherent diffractive imaging of single-grain defect dynamics in polycrystalline films". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aam6168. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1374598.
@article{osti_1374598,
title = {Bragg coherent diffractive imaging of single-grain defect dynamics in polycrystalline films},
author = {Yau, Allison and Cha, Wonsuk and Kanan, Matthew W. and Stephenson, G. Brian and Ulvestad, Andrew},
abstractNote = {Polycrystalline material properties depend on the distribution and interactions of their crystalline grains. In particular, grain boundaries and defects are crucial in determining their response to external stimuli. A long-standing challenge is thus to observe individual grains, defects, and strain dynamics inside functional materials. Here we report a technique capable of revealing grain heterogeneity, including strain fields and individual dislocations, that can be used under operando conditions in reactive environments: grain Bragg coherent diffractive imaging (gBCDI). Using a polycrystalline gold thin film subjected to heating, we show how gBCDI resolves grain boundary and dislocation dynamics in individual grains in three-dimensional detail with 10-nanometer spatial and subangstrom displacement field resolution. Finally, these results pave the way for understanding polycrystalline material response under external stimuli and, ideally, engineering particular functions.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aam6168},
journal = {Science},
number = 6339,
volume = 356,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 19 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri May 19 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 14works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • Dissolution is critical to nanomaterial stability, especially for partially dealloyed nanoparticle catalysts. Unfortunately, highly active catalysts are often not stable in their reactive environments, preventing widespread application. Thus, focusing on the structure–stability relationship at the nanoscale is crucial and will likely play an important role in meeting grand challenges. Recent advances in imaging capability have come from electron, X-ray, and other techniques but tend to be limited to specific sample environments and/or two-dimensional images. Here, we report investigations into the defect-stability relationship of silver nanoparticles to voltage-induced electrochemical dissolution imaged in situ in three dimensional detail by Bragg coherent diffractivemore » imaging. We first determine the average dissolution kinetics by stationary probe rotating disk electrode in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, which allows in situ measurement of Ag+ ion formation. We then observe the dissolution and redeposition processes in single nanocrystals, providing unique insight about the role of surface strain, defects, and their coupling to the dissolution chemistry. Finally, the methods developed and the knowledge gained go well beyond a “simple” silver electrochemistry and are applicable to all electrocatalytic reactions where functional links between activity and stability are controlled by structure and defect dynamics.« less
  • Three-dimensional imaging of protein crystals during X-ray diffraction experiments opens up a range of possibilities for optimising crystal quality and gaining new insights into the fundamental processes that drive radiation damage. Obtaining this information at the appropriate lengthscales however is extremely challenging. One approach that has been recently demonstrated as a promising avenue for charactering the size and shape of protein crystals at nanometre lengthscales is Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging (BCDI). BCDI is a recently developed technique that is able to recover the phase of the continuous diffraction intensity signal around individual Bragg peaks. When data is collected at multiplemore » points on a rocking curve a Reciprocal Space Map (RSM) can be assembled and then inverted using BCDI to obtain a three-dimensional image of the crystal. The first demonstration of two-dimensional BCDI of protein crystals was reported by Boutet at al., recently this work was extended to the study of radiation damage of micron-sized crystals. Here we present the first three-dimensional reconstructions of a Lysozyme protein crystal using BDI. The results are validated against RSM and TEM data and have implications for both radiation damage studies and for developing new approaches to structure retrieval from micron-sized protein crystals.« less
  • For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources.