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Title: Disk and circumsolar radiances in the presence of ice clouds

Abstract

The impact of ice clouds on solar disk and circumsolar radiances is investigated using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. The monochromatic direct and diffuse radiances are simulated at angles of 0 to 8° from the center of the sun. Input data for the model are derived from measurements conducted during the 2010 Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign together with state-of-the-art databases of optical properties of ice crystals and aerosols. For selected cases, the simulated radiances are compared with ground-based radiance measurements obtained by the Sun and Aureole Measurements (SAM) instrument. First, the sensitivity of the radiances to the ice cloud properties and aerosol optical thickness is addressed. The angular dependence of the disk and circumsolar radiances is found to be most sensitive to assumptions about ice crystal roughness (or, more generally, non-ideal features of ice crystals) and size distribution, with ice crystal habit playing a somewhat smaller role. Second, in comparisons with SAM data, the ice cloud optical thickness is adjusted for each case so that the simulated radiances agree closely (i.e., within 3 %) with the measured disk radiances. Circumsolar radiances at angles larger than ≈ 3° are systematically underestimated when assuming smooth ice crystals, whereas themore » agreement with the measurements is better when rough ice crystals are assumed. In conclusion, our results suggest that it may well be possible to infer the particle roughness directly from ground-based SAM measurements. In addition, the results show the necessity of correcting the ground-based measurements of direct radiation for the presence of diffuse radiation in the instrument's field of view, in particular in the presence of ice clouds.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Physics
  2. Finnish Meteorological Inst. (FMI), Helsinki (Finland)
  3. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Science
  4. Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (ITR), Leipzig (Germany)
  5. Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoping (Sweden); Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Earth and Space Science
  6. Visidyne, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1374578
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0008500; SC0014065; SC0016476; 272041
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Haapanala, Päivi, Räisänen, Petri, McFarquhar, Greg M., Tiira, Jussi, Macke, Andreas, Kahnert, Michael, DeVore, John, and Nousiainen, Timo. Disk and circumsolar radiances in the presence of ice clouds. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-17-6865-2017.
Haapanala, Päivi, Räisänen, Petri, McFarquhar, Greg M., Tiira, Jussi, Macke, Andreas, Kahnert, Michael, DeVore, John, & Nousiainen, Timo. Disk and circumsolar radiances in the presence of ice clouds. United States. doi:10.5194/acp-17-6865-2017.
Haapanala, Päivi, Räisänen, Petri, McFarquhar, Greg M., Tiira, Jussi, Macke, Andreas, Kahnert, Michael, DeVore, John, and Nousiainen, Timo. Mon . "Disk and circumsolar radiances in the presence of ice clouds". United States. doi:10.5194/acp-17-6865-2017. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1374578.
@article{osti_1374578,
title = {Disk and circumsolar radiances in the presence of ice clouds},
author = {Haapanala, Päivi and Räisänen, Petri and McFarquhar, Greg M. and Tiira, Jussi and Macke, Andreas and Kahnert, Michael and DeVore, John and Nousiainen, Timo},
abstractNote = {The impact of ice clouds on solar disk and circumsolar radiances is investigated using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. The monochromatic direct and diffuse radiances are simulated at angles of 0 to 8° from the center of the sun. Input data for the model are derived from measurements conducted during the 2010 Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign together with state-of-the-art databases of optical properties of ice crystals and aerosols. For selected cases, the simulated radiances are compared with ground-based radiance measurements obtained by the Sun and Aureole Measurements (SAM) instrument. First, the sensitivity of the radiances to the ice cloud properties and aerosol optical thickness is addressed. The angular dependence of the disk and circumsolar radiances is found to be most sensitive to assumptions about ice crystal roughness (or, more generally, non-ideal features of ice crystals) and size distribution, with ice crystal habit playing a somewhat smaller role. Second, in comparisons with SAM data, the ice cloud optical thickness is adjusted for each case so that the simulated radiances agree closely (i.e., within 3 %) with the measured disk radiances. Circumsolar radiances at angles larger than ≈ 3° are systematically underestimated when assuming smooth ice crystals, whereas the agreement with the measurements is better when rough ice crystals are assumed. In conclusion, our results suggest that it may well be possible to infer the particle roughness directly from ground-based SAM measurements. In addition, the results show the necessity of correcting the ground-based measurements of direct radiation for the presence of diffuse radiation in the instrument's field of view, in particular in the presence of ice clouds.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-17-6865-2017},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)},
number = 11,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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