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Title: Trace elements and radiocesium in game species near contaminated sites

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken SC 29802 USA
  2. University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken SC 29802 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1374473
Grant/Contract Number:
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Wildlife Management
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 18:02:01; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-541X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Oldenkamp, Ricki E., Bryan, Jr., Albert L., Kennamer, Robert A., Leaphart, James C., Webster, Sarah C., and Beasley, James C. Trace elements and radiocesium in game species near contaminated sites. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21314.
Oldenkamp, Ricki E., Bryan, Jr., Albert L., Kennamer, Robert A., Leaphart, James C., Webster, Sarah C., & Beasley, James C. Trace elements and radiocesium in game species near contaminated sites. United States. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21314.
Oldenkamp, Ricki E., Bryan, Jr., Albert L., Kennamer, Robert A., Leaphart, James C., Webster, Sarah C., and Beasley, James C. 2017. "Trace elements and radiocesium in game species near contaminated sites". United States. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21314.
@article{osti_1374473,
title = {Trace elements and radiocesium in game species near contaminated sites},
author = {Oldenkamp, Ricki E. and Bryan, Jr., Albert L. and Kennamer, Robert A. and Leaphart, James C. and Webster, Sarah C. and Beasley, James C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/jwmg.21314},
journal = {Journal of Wildlife Management},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 9, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Interest is increasing in using wetland plants in constructed wetlands to remove toxic elements from polluted wastewater. To identify those wetland plants that hyperaccumulate trace elements, 12 plant species were tested for their efficiency to bioconcentrate 10 potentially toxic trace elements including As, b, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, and Se. Individual plants were grown under carefully controlled conditions and supplied with 1 mg L{sup {minus}1} of each trace element individually for 10 d. Except B, all elements accumulated to much higher concentrations in roots than in shoots. Highest shoot tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW) of themore » various trace elements were attained by the following species: umbrella plant (Cyperus alternifolius L.) for Mn (198) and Cr (44); water zinnia (Wedelia trilobata Hitchc.) for Cd (148) and Ni (80); smartweed (Polygonum hydropiperoides Michx.) for Cu (95) and Pb (64); water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) for Hg (92), As (34), and Se (39); and mare's tail (hippuris vulgaris L.) for B (1132). Whereas, the following species attained the highest root tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW); stripped rush (Baumia rubiginosa) for Mn (1683); parrot's feather (Myriophyllum brasiliense Camb.) for Cd (1426) and Ni (1077); water lettuce for Cu (1038), Hg (1217), and As (177); smartweed for Cr (2980) and Pb (1882); mare's tail for B (1277); and monkey flower (Mimulus guttatus Fisch.) for Se (384). From a phytoremediation perspective, smartweed was probably the best plant species for trace element removal from wastewater due to its faster growth and higher plant density.« less
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