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Title: Proof Of Concept of Integrated Load Measurement in 3D Printed Structures

Abstract

Currently, research on structural health monitoring systems is focused on direct integration of the system into a component or structure. The latter results in a so-called smart structure. One example of a smart structure is a component with integrated strain sensing for continuous load monitoring. Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, now also enables such integration of functions inside components. As a proof-of-concept, the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technique was used to integrate a strain sensing element inside polymer (ABS) tensile test samples. The strain sensing element consisted of a closed capillary filled with a fluid and connected to an externally mounted pressure sensor. The volumetric deformation of the integrated capillary resulted in pressure changes in the fluid. The obtained pressure measurements during tensile testing are reported in this paper and compared to state-of-the-art extensometer measurements. The sensitivity of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor is primarily a function of the compressibility of the capillary fluid. Air- and watertightness are of critical importance for the proper functioning of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor. Therefore, the best after-treatment procedure was selected on basis of a comparative analysis. The obtained pressure measurements are linear with respect to the extensometer readings, and themore » uncertainty on the strain measurement of a capillary filled with water (incompressible fluid) is ±3.1 µstrain, which is approximately three times less sensitive than conventional strain gauges (±1 µstrain), but 32 times more sensitive than the same sensor based on air (compressible fluid) (±101 µstrain).« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Vrije Univ. Brussel (Belgium)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Agency for Innovation by Science and Technology, Flanders BE; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1374319
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-28990
Journal ID: ISSN 1424-8220
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Sensors
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1424-8220
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Hinderdael, Michael, Strantza, Maria, De Baere, Dieter, Zardon, Zoe, Lison, Margot, Devesse, Wim, and Guillaume, Patrick. Proof Of Concept of Integrated Load Measurement in 3D Printed Structures. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3390/s17020328.
Hinderdael, Michael, Strantza, Maria, De Baere, Dieter, Zardon, Zoe, Lison, Margot, Devesse, Wim, & Guillaume, Patrick. Proof Of Concept of Integrated Load Measurement in 3D Printed Structures. United States. doi:10.3390/s17020328.
Hinderdael, Michael, Strantza, Maria, De Baere, Dieter, Zardon, Zoe, Lison, Margot, Devesse, Wim, and Guillaume, Patrick. Thu . "Proof Of Concept of Integrated Load Measurement in 3D Printed Structures". United States. doi:10.3390/s17020328. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1374319.
@article{osti_1374319,
title = {Proof Of Concept of Integrated Load Measurement in 3D Printed Structures},
author = {Hinderdael, Michael and Strantza, Maria and De Baere, Dieter and Zardon, Zoe and Lison, Margot and Devesse, Wim and Guillaume, Patrick},
abstractNote = {Currently, research on structural health monitoring systems is focused on direct integration of the system into a component or structure. The latter results in a so-called smart structure. One example of a smart structure is a component with integrated strain sensing for continuous load monitoring. Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, now also enables such integration of functions inside components. As a proof-of-concept, the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technique was used to integrate a strain sensing element inside polymer (ABS) tensile test samples. The strain sensing element consisted of a closed capillary filled with a fluid and connected to an externally mounted pressure sensor. The volumetric deformation of the integrated capillary resulted in pressure changes in the fluid. The obtained pressure measurements during tensile testing are reported in this paper and compared to state-of-the-art extensometer measurements. The sensitivity of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor is primarily a function of the compressibility of the capillary fluid. Air- and watertightness are of critical importance for the proper functioning of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor. Therefore, the best after-treatment procedure was selected on basis of a comparative analysis. The obtained pressure measurements are linear with respect to the extensometer readings, and the uncertainty on the strain measurement of a capillary filled with water (incompressible fluid) is ±3.1 µstrain, which is approximately three times less sensitive than conventional strain gauges (±1 µstrain), but 32 times more sensitive than the same sensor based on air (compressible fluid) (±101 µstrain).},
doi = {10.3390/s17020328},
journal = {Sensors},
number = 2,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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