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Title: Recordings and Analysis of Atomic Ledge and Dislocation Movements in InGaAs to Nickelide Nanowire Phase Transformation

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla CA 92093 USA
  2. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla CA 92093 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1374088
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Small
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 30; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-08-07 09:36:19; Journal ID: ISSN 1613-6810
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chen, Renjie, and Dayeh, Shadi A. Recordings and Analysis of Atomic Ledge and Dislocation Movements in InGaAs to Nickelide Nanowire Phase Transformation. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/smll.201604117.
Chen, Renjie, & Dayeh, Shadi A. Recordings and Analysis of Atomic Ledge and Dislocation Movements in InGaAs to Nickelide Nanowire Phase Transformation. Germany. doi:10.1002/smll.201604117.
Chen, Renjie, and Dayeh, Shadi A. Thu . "Recordings and Analysis of Atomic Ledge and Dislocation Movements in InGaAs to Nickelide Nanowire Phase Transformation". Germany. doi:10.1002/smll.201604117.
@article{osti_1374088,
title = {Recordings and Analysis of Atomic Ledge and Dislocation Movements in InGaAs to Nickelide Nanowire Phase Transformation},
author = {Chen, Renjie and Dayeh, Shadi A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/smll.201604117},
journal = {Small},
number = 30,
volume = 13,
place = {Germany},
year = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 8, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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