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Title: Role of Ionic Functional Groups on Ion Transport at Perovskite Interfaces

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [1]
  1. Department of Polymer Science & Engineering, Conte Center for Polymer Research, University of Massachusetts, 120 Governors Drive Amherst MA 01003 USA
  2. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street Amherst MA 0100-9303 USA
  3. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street Amherst MA 0100-9303 USA, Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street Amherst Massachusetts 01003-9303 USA
  4. Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 Uttarakhand India
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1374087
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-08 06:21:40; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Liu, Yao, Renna, Lawrence A., Thompson, Hilary B., Page, Zachariah A., Emrick, Todd, Barnes, Michael D., Bag, Monojit, Venkataraman, D., and Russell, Thomas P.. Role of Ionic Functional Groups on Ion Transport at Perovskite Interfaces. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701235.
Liu, Yao, Renna, Lawrence A., Thompson, Hilary B., Page, Zachariah A., Emrick, Todd, Barnes, Michael D., Bag, Monojit, Venkataraman, D., & Russell, Thomas P.. Role of Ionic Functional Groups on Ion Transport at Perovskite Interfaces. Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701235.
Liu, Yao, Renna, Lawrence A., Thompson, Hilary B., Page, Zachariah A., Emrick, Todd, Barnes, Michael D., Bag, Monojit, Venkataraman, D., and Russell, Thomas P.. 2017. "Role of Ionic Functional Groups on Ion Transport at Perovskite Interfaces". Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701235.
@article{osti_1374087,
title = {Role of Ionic Functional Groups on Ion Transport at Perovskite Interfaces},
author = {Liu, Yao and Renna, Lawrence A. and Thompson, Hilary B. and Page, Zachariah A. and Emrick, Todd and Barnes, Michael D. and Bag, Monojit and Venkataraman, D. and Russell, Thomas P.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201701235},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Germany},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 7, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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