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Title: Tundra water budget and implications of precipitation underestimation

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks Alaska USA
  2. International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks Alaska USA
  3. Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego California USA, Department of Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter UK
  4. Department of Biological and the Environmental Science and Engineering Program, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso Texas USA
  5. Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego California USA, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield UK
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1373979
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1373980
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0005160
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-04-03 10:38:43; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Liljedahl, Anna K., Hinzman, Larry D., Kane, Douglas L., Oechel, Walter C., Tweedie, Craig E., and Zona, Donatella. Tundra water budget and implications of precipitation underestimation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016WR020001.
Liljedahl, Anna K., Hinzman, Larry D., Kane, Douglas L., Oechel, Walter C., Tweedie, Craig E., & Zona, Donatella. Tundra water budget and implications of precipitation underestimation. United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR020001.
Liljedahl, Anna K., Hinzman, Larry D., Kane, Douglas L., Oechel, Walter C., Tweedie, Craig E., and Zona, Donatella. Thu . "Tundra water budget and implications of precipitation underestimation". United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR020001.
@article{osti_1373979,
title = {Tundra water budget and implications of precipitation underestimation},
author = {Liljedahl, Anna K. and Hinzman, Larry D. and Kane, Douglas L. and Oechel, Walter C. and Tweedie, Craig E. and Zona, Donatella},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2016WR020001},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/2016WR020001

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 2
  • Microtopographic variation that develops among features (troughs, rims, and centers) within polygon al landforms of coastal arctic tundra strongly affects movement of surface water and snow and thereby affects soil water contents (θ) and active layer depth (ALD). Spatial variation in ALD among these features may exceed interannual variation in ALD caused by changes in climate and so needs to be represented in projections of changes in arctic ALD. In this study, increases in near-surface θ with decreasing surface elevation among polygon features at the Barrow Experimental Observatory (BEO) were modeled from topographic effects on redistribution of surface water andmore » snow and from lateral water exchange with a subsurface water table during a model run from 1981 to 2015. These increases in θ caused increases in thermal conductivity that in turn caused increases in soil heat fluxes and hence in ALD of up to 15 cm with lower versus higher surface elevation which were consistent with increases measured at BEO. The modeled effects of θ caused interannual variation in maximum ALD that compared well with measurements from 1985 to 2015 at the Barrow Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) site (R 2  = 0.61, RMSE = 0.03 m). For higher polygon features, interannual variation in ALD was more closely associated with annual precipitation than mean annual temperature, indicating that soil wetting from increases in precipitation may hasten permafrost degradation beyond that caused by soil warming from increases in air temperature. This degradation may be more rapid if increases in precipitation cause sustained wetting in higher features.« less
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  • Ongoing climate warming will likely perturb vertical distributions of nitrogen availability in tundra soils through enhancing nitrogen mineralization and releasing previously inaccessible nitrogen from frozen permafrost soil. But, arctic tundra responses to such changes are uncertain, because of a lack of vertically explicit nitrogen tracer experiments and untested hypotheses of root nitrogen uptake under the stress of microbial competition implemented in land models. We conducted a vertically explicit 15N tracer experiment for three dominant tundra species to quantify plant N uptake profiles. Then we applied a nutrient competition model (N-COM), which is being integrated into the ACME Land Model, tomore » explain the observations. Observations using an 15N tracer showed that plant N uptake profiles were not consistently related to root biomass density profiles, which challenges the prevailing hypothesis that root density always exerts first-order control on N uptake. By considering essential root traits (e.g., biomass distribution and nutrient uptake kinetics) with an appropriate plant-microbe nutrient competition framework, our model reasonably reproduced the observed patterns of plant N uptake. Additionally, we show that previously applied nutrient competition hypotheses in Earth System Land Models fail to explain the diverse plant N uptake profiles we observed. These results cast doubt on current climate-scale model predictions of arctic plant responses to elevated nitrogen supply under a changing climate and highlight the importance of considering essential root traits in large-scale land models. Finally, we provided suggestions and a short synthesis of data availability for future trait-based land model development.« less
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