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Title: Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

Abstract

The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers inmore » materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
OSTI Identifier:
1373875
Report Number(s):
DOE-PURDUE-04078-1
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0004078
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; x-ray detector; ultrafast; x-ray synchrotron

Citation Formats

Durbin, Stephen M. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1373875.
Durbin, Stephen M. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1373875
Durbin, Stephen M. 2017. "Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1373875. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373875.
@article{osti_1373875,
title = {Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays},
author = {Durbin, Stephen M.},
abstractNote = {The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.},
doi = {10.2172/1373875},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1373875}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}