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Title: Design Science Methodology Applied to a Chemical Surveillance Tool

Abstract

Public health surveillance systems gain significant benefits from integrating existing early incident detection systems,supported by closed data sources, with open source data.However, identifying potential alerting incidents relies on finding accurate, reliable sources and presenting the high volume of data in a way that increases analysts work efficiency; a challenge for any system that leverages open source data. In this paper, we present the design concept and the applied design science research methodology of ChemVeillance, a chemical analyst surveillance system.Our work portrays a system design and approach that translates theoretical methodology into practice creating a powerful surveillance system built for specific use cases.Researchers, designers, developers, and related professionals in the health surveillance community can build upon the principles and methodology described here to enhance and broaden current surveillance systems leading to improved situational awareness based on a robust integrated early warning system.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1373862
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123266
453040124
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA 2017), May 6-22, 2017, Denver, Colorado, 2652-2658
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Huang, Zhuanyi, Han, Kyungsik, Charles-Smith, Lauren E., and Henry, Michael J. Design Science Methodology Applied to a Chemical Surveillance Tool. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1145/3027063.3053263.
Huang, Zhuanyi, Han, Kyungsik, Charles-Smith, Lauren E., & Henry, Michael J. Design Science Methodology Applied to a Chemical Surveillance Tool. United States. doi:10.1145/3027063.3053263.
Huang, Zhuanyi, Han, Kyungsik, Charles-Smith, Lauren E., and Henry, Michael J. Thu . "Design Science Methodology Applied to a Chemical Surveillance Tool". United States. doi:10.1145/3027063.3053263.
@article{osti_1373862,
title = {Design Science Methodology Applied to a Chemical Surveillance Tool},
author = {Huang, Zhuanyi and Han, Kyungsik and Charles-Smith, Lauren E. and Henry, Michael J.},
abstractNote = {Public health surveillance systems gain significant benefits from integrating existing early incident detection systems,supported by closed data sources, with open source data.However, identifying potential alerting incidents relies on finding accurate, reliable sources and presenting the high volume of data in a way that increases analysts work efficiency; a challenge for any system that leverages open source data. In this paper, we present the design concept and the applied design science research methodology of ChemVeillance, a chemical analyst surveillance system.Our work portrays a system design and approach that translates theoretical methodology into practice creating a powerful surveillance system built for specific use cases.Researchers, designers, developers, and related professionals in the health surveillance community can build upon the principles and methodology described here to enhance and broaden current surveillance systems leading to improved situational awareness based on a robust integrated early warning system.},
doi = {10.1145/3027063.3053263},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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