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Title: Complete carbon analysis of sulfur-containing mixtures using postcolumn reaction and flame ionization detection

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN 55455, Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation, Newark DE 19716
  2. Activated Research Company, Eden Prairie MN 55344
  3. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA 01003
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1373831
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0001004
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
AIChE Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 63; Journal Issue: 12; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-02 17:57:20; Journal ID: ISSN 0001-1541
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Beach, Connor A., Joseph, Kristeen E., Dauenhauer, Paul J., Spanjers, Charles S., Jones, Andrew J., and Mountziaris, Triantafillos J. Complete carbon analysis of sulfur-containing mixtures using postcolumn reaction and flame ionization detection. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/aic.15888.
Beach, Connor A., Joseph, Kristeen E., Dauenhauer, Paul J., Spanjers, Charles S., Jones, Andrew J., & Mountziaris, Triantafillos J. Complete carbon analysis of sulfur-containing mixtures using postcolumn reaction and flame ionization detection. United States. doi:10.1002/aic.15888.
Beach, Connor A., Joseph, Kristeen E., Dauenhauer, Paul J., Spanjers, Charles S., Jones, Andrew J., and Mountziaris, Triantafillos J. 2017. "Complete carbon analysis of sulfur-containing mixtures using postcolumn reaction and flame ionization detection". United States. doi:10.1002/aic.15888.
@article{osti_1373831,
title = {Complete carbon analysis of sulfur-containing mixtures using postcolumn reaction and flame ionization detection},
author = {Beach, Connor A. and Joseph, Kristeen E. and Dauenhauer, Paul J. and Spanjers, Charles S. and Jones, Andrew J. and Mountziaris, Triantafillos J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/aic.15888},
journal = {AIChE Journal},
number = 12,
volume = 63,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 3, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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