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Title: The bias of a two-dimensional view: comparing two-dimensional and three-dimensional mesophyll surface area estimates using noninvasive imaging

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Department of Plant Sciences, University of California Davis, Davis CA 95616 USA
  2. School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven CT 06511 USA
  3. Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 USA
  4. USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Davis CA 95616 USA, Deparment of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1373818
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
New Phytologist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 215; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-08-03 16:04:17; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Théroux-Rancourt, Guillaume, Earles, J. Mason, Gilbert, Matthew E., Zwieniecki, Maciej A., Boyce, C. Kevin, McElrone, Andrew J., and Brodersen, Craig R. The bias of a two-dimensional view: comparing two-dimensional and three-dimensional mesophyll surface area estimates using noninvasive imaging. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/nph.14687.
Théroux-Rancourt, Guillaume, Earles, J. Mason, Gilbert, Matthew E., Zwieniecki, Maciej A., Boyce, C. Kevin, McElrone, Andrew J., & Brodersen, Craig R. The bias of a two-dimensional view: comparing two-dimensional and three-dimensional mesophyll surface area estimates using noninvasive imaging. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/nph.14687.
Théroux-Rancourt, Guillaume, Earles, J. Mason, Gilbert, Matthew E., Zwieniecki, Maciej A., Boyce, C. Kevin, McElrone, Andrew J., and Brodersen, Craig R. 2017. "The bias of a two-dimensional view: comparing two-dimensional and three-dimensional mesophyll surface area estimates using noninvasive imaging". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/nph.14687.
@article{osti_1373818,
title = {The bias of a two-dimensional view: comparing two-dimensional and three-dimensional mesophyll surface area estimates using noninvasive imaging},
author = {Théroux-Rancourt, Guillaume and Earles, J. Mason and Gilbert, Matthew E. and Zwieniecki, Maciej A. and Boyce, C. Kevin and McElrone, Andrew J. and Brodersen, Craig R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/nph.14687},
journal = {New Phytologist},
number = 4,
volume = 215,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 10, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Linear arrays of biconcave microlenses have been shown to be capable of imaging small objects using either x rays or neutrons. Because these lenses have small apertures and finite lengths, they are limited in their field of view (FOV). To increase the FOV, we propose that two sets of three-dimensional arrays of these microlenses be used. The spacing of the microlenses is calculated to achieve a complete image with uniform brightness. General design criteria are discussed in situations where either a one-to-one image or a magnified image is required.
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