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Title: Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

Abstract

'This report summarizes the work progress over the last 1.75 years of a 3 year project. The objectives of the project have been to develop a new class of ceramic-supported polymeric membranes that could be tailored-designed for a wide-range of applications in remediation and pollution prevention. To date, a new class of chemically-modified ceramic membranes was developed for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and for the pervaporation removal of volatile organics from aqueous systems. These new ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membranes are fabricated by modifying the pore surface of a ceramic membrane support by a graft polymerization process (Chaimberg and Cohen, 1994). The graft polymerization process consists of activating the membrane surface with alkoxy vinyl silanes onto which vinyl monomers are added via free-radical graft polymerization resulting in a thin surface layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. Reaction conditions are selected based on knowledge of the graft polymerization kinetics for the specific polymer/substrate system. The resultant ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membrane is a composite structure in which mechanical strength is provided by the ceramic support and the selectivity is determined by the covalently bonded polymer brush layer. Thus, one of the unique attributes of the CSP membrane is that it can bemore » used in environments where the polymer layer is swollen (or even completely miscible) in the mixture to be separated (Castro et al., 1993). It is important to note that the above modification process is carried out under mild conditions (e.g., temperature of about 70 C) and is well suited for large scale commercial application. In a series of studies, the applicability of a polyvinylpyrrolidone CSP membrane was demonstrated for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsion under a variety of flow conditions (Castro et al.,1996). Improved membrane performance was achieved due to minimization of surface adsorption of the oil components. For the special case of long surface chains, significant additional performance improvement permeate stream was attained at high Reynolds numbers. At the high Reynolds number condition, shear-induced deformation of the terminally anchored polymer chains and as a consequence the screening of the pore entry, resulted in improved permeate quality. Current studies are focused on the optimization of the polymer surface layer and quantification of chemical and hydrodynamic polymer-emulsion interactions.'« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science and Risk Policy
OSTI Identifier:
13736
Report Number(s):
EMSP-54926-98
ON: DE00013736
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40; 54; 05; Progress Report; Ligands; Ion Exchange; Chemical Preparation; Remedial Action; Decontamination; Decommissioning; High-Level Radioactive Wastes; Radioactive Wastes; Chemical Wastes; PROGRESS REPORT; LIGANDS; ION EXCHANGE; CHEMICAL PREPARATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; DECONTAMINATION; DECOMMISSIONING; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; CHEMICAL WASTES

Citation Formats

Cohen, Y. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/13736.
Cohen, Y. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/13736
Cohen, Y. Mon . "Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/13736. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/13736.
@article{osti_13736,
title = {Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report},
author = {Cohen, Y},
abstractNote = {'This report summarizes the work progress over the last 1.75 years of a 3 year project. The objectives of the project have been to develop a new class of ceramic-supported polymeric membranes that could be tailored-designed for a wide-range of applications in remediation and pollution prevention. To date, a new class of chemically-modified ceramic membranes was developed for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and for the pervaporation removal of volatile organics from aqueous systems. These new ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membranes are fabricated by modifying the pore surface of a ceramic membrane support by a graft polymerization process (Chaimberg and Cohen, 1994). The graft polymerization process consists of activating the membrane surface with alkoxy vinyl silanes onto which vinyl monomers are added via free-radical graft polymerization resulting in a thin surface layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. Reaction conditions are selected based on knowledge of the graft polymerization kinetics for the specific polymer/substrate system. The resultant ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membrane is a composite structure in which mechanical strength is provided by the ceramic support and the selectivity is determined by the covalently bonded polymer brush layer. Thus, one of the unique attributes of the CSP membrane is that it can be used in environments where the polymer layer is swollen (or even completely miscible) in the mixture to be separated (Castro et al., 1993). It is important to note that the above modification process is carried out under mild conditions (e.g., temperature of about 70 C) and is well suited for large scale commercial application. In a series of studies, the applicability of a polyvinylpyrrolidone CSP membrane was demonstrated for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsion under a variety of flow conditions (Castro et al.,1996). Improved membrane performance was achieved due to minimization of surface adsorption of the oil components. For the special case of long surface chains, significant additional performance improvement permeate stream was attained at high Reynolds numbers. At the high Reynolds number condition, shear-induced deformation of the terminally anchored polymer chains and as a consequence the screening of the pore entry, resulted in improved permeate quality. Current studies are focused on the optimization of the polymer surface layer and quantification of chemical and hydrodynamic polymer-emulsion interactions.'},
doi = {10.2172/13736},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/13736}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {6}
}