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Title: Description of the LASSO Alpha 1 Release

Abstract

The Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility began a pilot project in May 2015 to design a routine, high-resolution modeling capability to complement ARM’s extensive suite of measurements. This modeling capability has been named the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) project. The availability of LES simulations with concurrent observations will serve many purposes. LES helps bridge the scale gap between DOE ARM observations and models, and the use of routine LES adds value to observations. It provides a self-consistent representation of the atmosphere and a dynamical context for the observations. Further, it elucidates unobservable processes and properties. LASSO will generate a simulation library for researchers that enables statistical approaches beyond a single-case mentality. It will also provide tools necessary for modelers to reproduce the LES and conduct their own sensitivity experiments. Many different uses are envisioned for the combined LASSO LES and observational library. For an observationalist, LASSO can help inform instrument remote-sensing retrievals, conduct Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), and test implications of radar scan strategies or flight paths. For a theoretician, LASSO will help calculate estimates of fluxes and co-variability of values, and test relationships without having to runmore » the model yourself. For a modeler, LASSO will help one know ahead of time which days have good forcing, have co-registered observations at high-resolution scales, and have simulation inputs and corresponding outputs to test parameterizations. Further details on the overall LASSO project are available at http://www.arm. gov/science/themes/lasso.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [3];  [2];  [3]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1373564
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-TR-194
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Southern Great Plains, LASSO, Large-Eddy Simulation, WRF, SAM, modeling

Citation Formats

Gustafson, William I., Vogelmann, Andrew M., Cheng, Xiaoping, Endo, Satoshi, Krishna, Bhargavi, Li, Zhijin, Toto, Tami, and Xiao, H. Description of the LASSO Alpha 1 Release. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1373564.
Gustafson, William I., Vogelmann, Andrew M., Cheng, Xiaoping, Endo, Satoshi, Krishna, Bhargavi, Li, Zhijin, Toto, Tami, & Xiao, H. Description of the LASSO Alpha 1 Release. United States. doi:10.2172/1373564.
Gustafson, William I., Vogelmann, Andrew M., Cheng, Xiaoping, Endo, Satoshi, Krishna, Bhargavi, Li, Zhijin, Toto, Tami, and Xiao, H. 2017. "Description of the LASSO Alpha 1 Release". United States. doi:10.2172/1373564. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373564.
@article{osti_1373564,
title = {Description of the LASSO Alpha 1 Release},
author = {Gustafson, William I. and Vogelmann, Andrew M. and Cheng, Xiaoping and Endo, Satoshi and Krishna, Bhargavi and Li, Zhijin and Toto, Tami and Xiao, H},
abstractNote = {The Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility began a pilot project in May 2015 to design a routine, high-resolution modeling capability to complement ARM’s extensive suite of measurements. This modeling capability has been named the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) project. The availability of LES simulations with concurrent observations will serve many purposes. LES helps bridge the scale gap between DOE ARM observations and models, and the use of routine LES adds value to observations. It provides a self-consistent representation of the atmosphere and a dynamical context for the observations. Further, it elucidates unobservable processes and properties. LASSO will generate a simulation library for researchers that enables statistical approaches beyond a single-case mentality. It will also provide tools necessary for modelers to reproduce the LES and conduct their own sensitivity experiments. Many different uses are envisioned for the combined LASSO LES and observational library. For an observationalist, LASSO can help inform instrument remote-sensing retrievals, conduct Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), and test implications of radar scan strategies or flight paths. For a theoretician, LASSO will help calculate estimates of fluxes and co-variability of values, and test relationships without having to run the model yourself. For a modeler, LASSO will help one know ahead of time which days have good forcing, have co-registered observations at high-resolution scales, and have simulation inputs and corresponding outputs to test parameterizations. Further details on the overall LASSO project are available at http://www.arm. gov/science/themes/lasso.},
doi = {10.2172/1373564},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility began a pilot project in May 2015 to design a routine, high-resolution modeling capability to complement ARM’s extensive suite of measurements. This modeling capability has been named the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) project. The initial focus of LASSO is on shallow convection at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility. The availability of LES simulations with concurrent observations will serve many purposes. LES helps bridge the scale gap between DOE ARM observations and models, and the use of routine LES addsmore » value to observations. It provides a self-consistent representation of the atmosphere and a dynamical context for the observations. Further, it elucidates unobservable processes and properties. LASSO will generate a simulation library for researchers that enables statistical approaches beyond a single-case mentality. It will also provide tools necessary for modelers to reproduce the LES and conduct their own sensitivity experiments. Many different uses are envisioned for the combined LASSO LES and observational library. For an observationalist, LASSO can help inform instrument remote sensing retrievals, conduct Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), and test implications of radar scan strategies or flight paths. For a theoretician, LASSO will help calculate estimates of fluxes and co-variability of values, and test relationships without having to run the model yourself. For a modeler, LASSO will help one know ahead of time which days have good forcing, have co-registered observations at high-resolution scales, and have simulation inputs and corresponding outputs to test parameterizations. Further details on the overall LASSO project are available at https://www.arm.gov/capabilities/modeling/lasso.« less
  • The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Research Fa-cility began a pilot project in May 2015 to design a routine, high-resolution modeling capability to complement ARM’s extensive suite of measurements. This modeling capability, envisioned in the ARM Decadal Vision (U.S. Department of Energy 2014), subsequently has been named the Large-Eddy Simu-lation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) project, and it has an initial focus of shallow convection at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) atmospheric observatory. This report documents the recommendations resulting from the pilot project to be considered by ARM for imple-mentation into routinemore » operations. During the pilot phase, LASSO has evolved from the initial vision outlined in the pilot project white paper (Gustafson and Vogelmann 2015) to what is recommended in this report. Further details on the overall LASSO project are available at https://www.arm.gov/capabilities/modeling/lasso. Feedback regarding LASSO and the recommendations in this report can be directed to William Gustafson, the project principal investigator (PI), and Andrew Vogelmann, the co-principal investigator (Co-PI), via lasso@arm.gov.« less
  • This technical not describes the use of a simple program for calculation of the dispersion of a slug release of tracer under riverine and run-of-the-river reservoir conditions. The program, called ILS HP-67, is designed to be used on an HP-67 programmable calculator. Neither the derivation of the mathematical expressions nor the limits of applicability are detailed. Program ILS HP-67 provides approximate far-field relative concentrations for a short duration release of liquid into a steadily flowing river. The release is assumed to consist of a quantity of liquid with some portion, called the tracer, being matter which is of concern. Herein,more » relative concentration is defined as the concentration of tracer in a sample of water divided by the concentration of tracer in the released liquid.« less
  • Performance assessment models typically account for the processes of sorption and dissolution-precipitation by using an empirical distribution coefficient, commonly referred to as K{sub d} that combines the effects of all chemical reactions between solid and aqueous phases. In recent years, however, there has been an increasing awareness that performance assessments based solely on empirically based K{sub d} models may be incomplete, particularly for applications involving radionuclides having sorption and solubility properties that are sensitive to variations in the in-situ chemical environment. To accommodate variations in the in-situ chemical environment, and to assess its impact on radionuclide mobility, it is necessarymore » to model radionuclide release, transport, and chemical processes in a coupled fashion. This modeling has been done and incorporated into the two-dimensional, finite-element, computer code BLT-EC (Breach, Leach, Transport, Equilibrium Chemistry). BLT-EC is capable of predicting container degradation, waste-form leaching, and advective-dispersive, multispecies, solute transport. BLT-EC accounts for retardation directly by modeling the chemical processes of complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions. In this report we: (1) present a detailed description of the various physical and chemical processes that control the release and migration of radionuclides from shallow land LLW disposal facilities; (2) formulate the mathematical models that represent these processes; (3) outline how these models are incorporated and implemented in BLT-EC; and (4) demonstrate the application of BLT-EC on a set of example problems.« less