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Title: Maxine: A spreadsheet for estimating dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases

Abstract

MAXINE is an EXCEL© spreadsheet, which is used to estimate dose to individuals for routine and accidental atmospheric releases of radioactive materials. MAXINE does not contain an atmospheric dispersion model, but rather doses are estimated using air and ground concentrations as input. Minimal input is required to run the program and site specific parameters are used when possible. Complete code description, verification of models, and user’s manual have been included.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1373544
Report Number(s):
WSRC-TR-2002-00360
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; dose determination; atmospheric release; dose model; maxine

Citation Formats

Jannik, Tim, Bell, Evaleigh, and Dixon, Kenneth. Maxine: A spreadsheet for estimating dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1373544.
Jannik, Tim, Bell, Evaleigh, & Dixon, Kenneth. Maxine: A spreadsheet for estimating dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases. United States. doi:10.2172/1373544.
Jannik, Tim, Bell, Evaleigh, and Dixon, Kenneth. 2017. "Maxine: A spreadsheet for estimating dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases". United States. doi:10.2172/1373544. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373544.
@article{osti_1373544,
title = {Maxine: A spreadsheet for estimating dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases},
author = {Jannik, Tim and Bell, Evaleigh and Dixon, Kenneth},
abstractNote = {MAXINE is an EXCEL© spreadsheet, which is used to estimate dose to individuals for routine and accidental atmospheric releases of radioactive materials. MAXINE does not contain an atmospheric dispersion model, but rather doses are estimated using air and ground concentrations as input. Minimal input is required to run the program and site specific parameters are used when possible. Complete code description, verification of models, and user’s manual have been included.},
doi = {10.2172/1373544},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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  • MAXINE is an EXCEL(C) spreadsheet, which is used to estimate dose to individuals for routine atmospheric releases of radioactive materials. MAXINE does not contain an atmospheric dispersion model, but rather doses are estimated using air and ground concentrations as input. Minimal input is required to run the program and site specific parameters are used when possible. Complete code description, verification of models, and user's manual have been included.
  • An EXCEL{reg_sign} spreadsheet has been developed that, when combined with the PC version of XOQDOQ, will generate estimates of maximum individual dose from routine atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The spreadsheet, MAXINE, utilizes a variety of atmospheric dispersion factors to calculate radiation dose as recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Regulatory Guide 1.109 [USNRC 1977a]. The methodology suggested herein includes use of both the MAXINE spreadsheet and the PC version of XOQDOQ.
  • LADTAP XL© is an EXCEL© spreadsheet used to estimate dose to offsite individuals and populations resulting from routine and accidental releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. LADTAP XL© contains two worksheets: LADTAP and IRRIDOSE. The LADTAP worksheet estimates dose for environmental pathways including external exposure resulting from recreational activities on the Savannah River and internal exposure resulting from ingestion of water, fish, and invertebrates originating from the Savannah River. IRRIDOSE estimates offsite dose to individuals and populations from irrigation of foodstuffs with contaminated water from the Savannah River. In 2004, a complete description of the LADTAP XL© codemore » and an associated user’s manual was documented in LADTAP XL©: A Spreadsheet for Estimating Dose Resulting from Aqueous Release (WSRC-TR-2004-00059) and revised input parameters, dose coefficients, and radionuclide decay constants were incorporated into LADTAP XL© Version 2013 (SRNL-STI-2011-00238). LADTAP XL© Version 2017 is a slight modification to Version 2013 with minor changes made for more user-friendly parameter inputs and organization, updates in the time conversion factors used within the dose calculations, and fixed an issue with the expected time build-up parameter referenced within the population shoreline dose calculations. This manual has been produced to update the code description, verification of the models, and provide an updated user’s manual. LADTAP XL© Version 2017 has been verified by Minter (2017) and is ready for use at the Savannah River Site (SRS).« less
  • Preliminary radiation doses were estimated and reported during Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. As the project has progressed, additional information regarding the magnitude and timing of past radioactive releases has been developed, and the general scope of the required calculations has been enhanced. The overall HEDR computational model for computing doses attributable to atmospheric releases from Hanford Site operations is called HEDRIC (Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes). It consists of four interrelated models: source term, atmospheric transport, environmental accumulation, and individual dose. The source term and atmospheric transport models are documented elsewhere. This reportmore » describes the initial implementation of the design specifications for the environmental accumulation model and computer code, called DESCARTES (Dynamic EStimates of Concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments), and the individual dose model and computer code, called CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides). The computations required of these models and the design specifications for their codes were documented in Napier et al. (1992). Revisions to the original specifications and the basis for modeling decisions are explained. This report is not the final code documentation but gives the status of the model and code development to date. Final code documentation is scheduled to be completed in FY 1994 following additional code upgrades and refinements. The user's guide included in this report describes the operation of the environmental accumulation and individual dose codes and associated pre- and post-processor programs. A programmer's guide describes the logical structure of the programs and their input and output files.« less
  • Measurements of uptake of tritium by humans and laboratory animals following exposure to tritiated hydrogen gas, HT, suggest that the radiotoxicity of HT is four orders of magnitude less than that of tritiated water, HTO. However, this analysis does not take into account the conversion of HT into HTO following release into the environment. Experimental releases of HT have demonstrated that HT release to the environment is converted to HTO by soil microorganisms. In this report two methods are used to estimate the effect of HT to HTO conversion on the inhalation dose of individuals exposed to tritium downwind ofmore » a release of HT. From this analysis it is predicted that the ratio of dose from inhalation of tritium following an atmospheric release of HT, as compared to inhalation of HTO, is closer to 0.01 than the 0.0001 attributed to simple HT inhalation. Under meteorologic conditions which keep the HT release near the surface and promote optimum soil microbial activity, the analysis suggests that the ratio of dose from an atmospheric HT release could be as high as 25% of that from an atmospheric HTO release.« less