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Title: Quantitative analysis of concrete using portable x-ray fluorescence: Method development and validation

Abstract

During Decommissioning and Demolition (D&D) activities at SRS, it is important that the building be screened for radionuclides and heavy metals to ensure that the proper safety and disposal metrics are in place. A major source of contamination at DOE facilities is the accumulation of mercury contamination, from nuclear material processing and Liquid Waste System (LWS). This buildup of mercury could possibly cause harm to any demolition crew or the environment should this material be released. The current standard method is to take core samples in various places in the facility and use X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to detect the contamination. This standard method comes with a high financial value due to the security levels of these sample facilities with unknown contamination levels. Here in we propose the use of portable XRF units to detect for this contamination on-site. To validate this method, the instrument has to be calibrated to detect the heavy metal contamination, be both precise with the known elemental concentrations and consistent with its actual results of a sample concrete and pristine contaminant, and be able to detect changes in the sample concrete’s composition. After receiving the various concrete samples with their compositions found by a XRF wave-dispersivemore » method, the calibration factor’s linear regressions were adjusted to give the baseline concentration of the concrete with no contamination. Samples of both concrete and concrete/flyash were evaluated; their standard deviations revealed that the measurements were consistent with the known composition. Finally, the samples were contaminated with different concentrations of sodium tungsten dihydrate, allowed to air dry, and measured. When the contaminated samples were analyzed, the heavy metal contamination was seen within the spectrum of the instrument, but there was not a trend of quantification based on the concentration of the solution.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1373540
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2017-00493
TRN: US1801110
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS; CONCRETES; MERCURY; CONTAMINATION; RADIOISOTOPES

Citation Formats

Washington, Aaron L., Narrows, William, Christian, Jonathan H., and Msgwood, Leroy. Quantitative analysis of concrete using portable x-ray fluorescence: Method development and validation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1373540.
Washington, Aaron L., Narrows, William, Christian, Jonathan H., & Msgwood, Leroy. Quantitative analysis of concrete using portable x-ray fluorescence: Method development and validation. United States. doi:10.2172/1373540.
Washington, Aaron L., Narrows, William, Christian, Jonathan H., and Msgwood, Leroy. Thu . "Quantitative analysis of concrete using portable x-ray fluorescence: Method development and validation". United States. doi:10.2172/1373540. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373540.
@article{osti_1373540,
title = {Quantitative analysis of concrete using portable x-ray fluorescence: Method development and validation},
author = {Washington, Aaron L. and Narrows, William and Christian, Jonathan H. and Msgwood, Leroy},
abstractNote = {During Decommissioning and Demolition (D&D) activities at SRS, it is important that the building be screened for radionuclides and heavy metals to ensure that the proper safety and disposal metrics are in place. A major source of contamination at DOE facilities is the accumulation of mercury contamination, from nuclear material processing and Liquid Waste System (LWS). This buildup of mercury could possibly cause harm to any demolition crew or the environment should this material be released. The current standard method is to take core samples in various places in the facility and use X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to detect the contamination. This standard method comes with a high financial value due to the security levels of these sample facilities with unknown contamination levels. Here in we propose the use of portable XRF units to detect for this contamination on-site. To validate this method, the instrument has to be calibrated to detect the heavy metal contamination, be both precise with the known elemental concentrations and consistent with its actual results of a sample concrete and pristine contaminant, and be able to detect changes in the sample concrete’s composition. After receiving the various concrete samples with their compositions found by a XRF wave-dispersive method, the calibration factor’s linear regressions were adjusted to give the baseline concentration of the concrete with no contamination. Samples of both concrete and concrete/flyash were evaluated; their standard deviations revealed that the measurements were consistent with the known composition. Finally, the samples were contaminated with different concentrations of sodium tungsten dihydrate, allowed to air dry, and measured. When the contaminated samples were analyzed, the heavy metal contamination was seen within the spectrum of the instrument, but there was not a trend of quantification based on the concentration of the solution.},
doi = {10.2172/1373540},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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