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Title: Residual Stresses and Other Properties of Teardrops

Abstract

The Department of Energy’s 3013 Standard for packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage up to fifty years specifies a minimum of two individually welded, nested containers herein referred to as the 3013 outer and the 3013 inner.1 Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a potential failure mechanism for 3013 inner containers.2,3 The bagless transfer container (BTC), a 3013 inner container used by Hanford and Savanna River Site (SRS) made from 304L stainless steel (SS), poses the greatest concern for SCC.4,5 The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) use stressed metal samples known as teardrops as screening tools in SCC studies to evaluate factors that could result in cracks in the 3013 containers.6,7 This report provides background information on the teardrops used in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) SMP studies including method of construction, composition and variability. In addition, the report discusses measurements of residual stresses in teardrops and compares the results with residual stresses in BTCs reported previously.4 Factors affecting residual stresses, including teardrop dimensions and surface finish, are also discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1373501
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-26340
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; residual stress teardrop

Citation Formats

Stroud, Mary Ann, Veirs, Douglas Kirk, Berg, John M., Hill, Mary Ann, Rios, Daniel, and Duque, Juan. Residual Stresses and Other Properties of Teardrops. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1373501.
Stroud, Mary Ann, Veirs, Douglas Kirk, Berg, John M., Hill, Mary Ann, Rios, Daniel, & Duque, Juan. Residual Stresses and Other Properties of Teardrops. United States. doi:10.2172/1373501.
Stroud, Mary Ann, Veirs, Douglas Kirk, Berg, John M., Hill, Mary Ann, Rios, Daniel, and Duque, Juan. 2017. "Residual Stresses and Other Properties of Teardrops". United States. doi:10.2172/1373501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373501.
@article{osti_1373501,
title = {Residual Stresses and Other Properties of Teardrops},
author = {Stroud, Mary Ann and Veirs, Douglas Kirk and Berg, John M. and Hill, Mary Ann and Rios, Daniel and Duque, Juan},
abstractNote = {The Department of Energy’s 3013 Standard for packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage up to fifty years specifies a minimum of two individually welded, nested containers herein referred to as the 3013 outer and the 3013 inner.1 Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a potential failure mechanism for 3013 inner containers.2,3 The bagless transfer container (BTC), a 3013 inner container used by Hanford and Savanna River Site (SRS) made from 304L stainless steel (SS), poses the greatest concern for SCC.4,5 The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) use stressed metal samples known as teardrops as screening tools in SCC studies to evaluate factors that could result in cracks in the 3013 containers.6,7 This report provides background information on the teardrops used in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) SMP studies including method of construction, composition and variability. In addition, the report discusses measurements of residual stresses in teardrops and compares the results with residual stresses in BTCs reported previously.4 Factors affecting residual stresses, including teardrop dimensions and surface finish, are also discussed.},
doi = {10.2172/1373501},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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  • The influence of material properties on the magnitude of the residual stresses around a nuclear cavity is examined. Particular attention in given to the effect on peak transverse residual stresses of parametrically varying material properties such as water content, percentage of air-filled voids, elastic properties, shear strength and depth of burial. The influence of these parametric variations on the final cavity radius is discussed. A correlation between peak residual stress and cavity radius is noted; a larger cavity radius implies a smaller residual stress.
  • This program assessed the effects of SMAW repair welding on changes in surface residual stress distribution, fracture toughness and hardness around girth weld joints in linepipe. The following types of repair welds were studied: a part wall repair, a multiple part wall repair and full wall repair. The results were compared with a non-repaired weld sample. It was found that for the weld samples studied in this program, the full wall repair produced the most severe residual stress distribution followed by the multiple and single part wall repairs. The single repair only slightly increased the residual stress distribution when comparedmore » to the as-welded condition. Dramatic reductions in toughness were found in the multiple and full repairs due to coarse-grained regions produced during the repair operations. The single part wall repair exhibited an increase in toughness as a result of the addition of a cosmetic capping pass which resulted in greater grain refinement. This suggests that repair procedures utilizing a stringer or temper bead technique may reduce the effect of weld repairs on toughness.« less
  • This program assessed the effects of SMAW repair welding on changes in surface residual stress distribution, fracture toughness and hardness around girth weld joints in linepipe. The following types of repair welds were studied: a part wall repair, a multiple part wall repair and full wall repair. The results were compared with a non-repaired weld sample. It was found that for the weld samples studied in this program, the full wall repair produced the most severe residual stress distribution followed by the multiple and single part wall repairs. The single repair only slightly increased the residual stress distribution when comparedmore » to the as-welded condition. Dramatic reductions in toughness were found in the multiple and full repairs due to coarse-grained regions produced during the repair operations. The single part wall repair exhibited an increase in toughness as a result of the addition of a cosmetic capping pass which resulted in greater grain refinement. This suggests that repair procedures utilizing a stringer or temper bead technique may reduce the effect of weld repairs on toughness.« less
  • The study is divided into three tasks. Task I is concerned with predicting and understanding the effects of residual stresses due to weld repairs of pressure vessels. Task II examines residual stresses due to an electron beam weld. Task III addresses the problem of residual stresses produced by weld cladding at a nozzle vessel intersection. The objective of Task I is to develop a computational model for predicting residual stress states due to a weld repair of pressure vessel and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the creation of the residual stresses. Experimental data from the Heavymore » Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) is used to validate the computational model. In Task II, the residual stress model is applied to the case of an electron beam weld of a compact tension freacture specimen. The results in the form of residual stresses near the weld are then used to explain unexpected fracture behavior which is observed in the testing of the specimen. For Task III, the residual stress model is applied to the cladding process used in nozzle regions of nuclear pressure vessels. The residual stresses obtained from this analysis are evaluated to determine their effect on the phenomena of under-clad cracking.« less