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Title: Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

Abstract

'The project on ceramic-supported polymer membranes focuses on the development of a novel class of membranes for the separation of organics from both organic-aqueous and organic-organic mixtures, Theses membranes are fabricated by a graft polymerization process where polymer chains are grown onto the surface of a ceramic support membrane. The surface graft polymerization process, developed at UCLA, results in the formation of a thin polymer layer covalently bonded to the membrane pore surface as a layer of terminally anchored polymeric chains. Through the selection of the polymer most appropriate for the desired separation task, the graft polymerized surface layer can be synthesized to impart specific separation properties to the membrane. It is expected that this project will lead to the demonstration of a new technology for the tailor design of a new class of selective and robust ceramic-supported polymer membranes. This new approach will allow the rapid deployment of task-specific membranes for the separation of waste constituents for subsequent recovery, treatment or disposal. Progress to date includes the preparation of successful silica-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and a silica-polyvinylacetate (PVAc) pervaporation membrane for the separation of organics from water. Current work is ongoing to study themore » performance of the pervaporation membrane for the removal of chlorinated organics from water and to develop a pervaporation membrane for organic-organic separation. In another aspect of the study, the authors are studying the hydrophilic PVP CSP membrane for oil-in-water emulsion treatment with the goal of determining the optimal membrane polymer surface structure as a function of various operating conditions (e.g., tube-side Reynolds number and transmembrane pressure), Work is also in progress to characterize the polymer layer by AFM and internal reflection FTIR, and to model the conformation of the polymer surface layer.'« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science and Risk Policy
OSTI Identifier:
13735
Report Number(s):
EMSP-54926-97
ON: DE00013735
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40; 54; 05; Progress Report; Ligands; Ion Exchange; Chemical Preparation; Remedial Action; Decontamination; Decommissioning; High-Level Radioactive Wastes; Radioactive Wastes; Chemical Wastes; PROGRESS REPORT; LIGANDS; ION EXCHANGE; CHEMICAL PREPARATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; DECONTAMINATION; DECOMMISSIONING; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; CHEMICAL WASTES

Citation Formats

Cohen, Y. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2172/13735.
Cohen, Y. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/13735
Cohen, Y. Wed . "Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/13735. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/13735.
@article{osti_13735,
title = {Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997},
author = {Cohen, Y},
abstractNote = {'The project on ceramic-supported polymer membranes focuses on the development of a novel class of membranes for the separation of organics from both organic-aqueous and organic-organic mixtures, Theses membranes are fabricated by a graft polymerization process where polymer chains are grown onto the surface of a ceramic support membrane. The surface graft polymerization process, developed at UCLA, results in the formation of a thin polymer layer covalently bonded to the membrane pore surface as a layer of terminally anchored polymeric chains. Through the selection of the polymer most appropriate for the desired separation task, the graft polymerized surface layer can be synthesized to impart specific separation properties to the membrane. It is expected that this project will lead to the demonstration of a new technology for the tailor design of a new class of selective and robust ceramic-supported polymer membranes. This new approach will allow the rapid deployment of task-specific membranes for the separation of waste constituents for subsequent recovery, treatment or disposal. Progress to date includes the preparation of successful silica-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and a silica-polyvinylacetate (PVAc) pervaporation membrane for the separation of organics from water. Current work is ongoing to study the performance of the pervaporation membrane for the removal of chlorinated organics from water and to develop a pervaporation membrane for organic-organic separation. In another aspect of the study, the authors are studying the hydrophilic PVP CSP membrane for oil-in-water emulsion treatment with the goal of determining the optimal membrane polymer surface structure as a function of various operating conditions (e.g., tube-side Reynolds number and transmembrane pressure), Work is also in progress to characterize the polymer layer by AFM and internal reflection FTIR, and to model the conformation of the polymer surface layer.'},
doi = {10.2172/13735},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/13735}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {1}
}