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Title: Multi-Megawatt-Scale Power-Hardware-in-the-Loop Interface for Testing Ancillary Grid Services by Converter-Coupled Generation: Preprint

Abstract

Power-hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) is a simulation tool that can support electrical systems engineers in the development and experimental validation of novel, advanced control schemes that ensure the robustness and resiliency of electrical grids that have high penetrations of low-inertia variable renewable resources. With PHIL, the impact of the device under test on a generation or distribution system can be analyzed using a real-time simulator (RTS). PHIL allows for the interconnection of the RTS with a 7 megavolt ampere (MVA) power amplifier to test multi-megawatt renewable assets available at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). This paper addresses issues related to the development of a PHIL interface that allows testing hardware devices at actual scale. In particular, the novel PHIL interface algorithm and high-speed digital interface, which minimize the critical loop delay, are discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1373487
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5D00-68856
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 2017 IEEE 18th Workshop on Control and Modeling for Power Electronics (COMPEL), 9/12 July 2017, Stanford, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; power grids; microgrids; power system faults; power quality; wind energy integration; test facilities; PHIL

Citation Formats

Koralewicz, Przemyslaw J, Gevorgian, Vahan, and Wallen, Robert B. Multi-Megawatt-Scale Power-Hardware-in-the-Loop Interface for Testing Ancillary Grid Services by Converter-Coupled Generation: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Koralewicz, Przemyslaw J, Gevorgian, Vahan, & Wallen, Robert B. Multi-Megawatt-Scale Power-Hardware-in-the-Loop Interface for Testing Ancillary Grid Services by Converter-Coupled Generation: Preprint. United States.
Koralewicz, Przemyslaw J, Gevorgian, Vahan, and Wallen, Robert B. 2017. "Multi-Megawatt-Scale Power-Hardware-in-the-Loop Interface for Testing Ancillary Grid Services by Converter-Coupled Generation: Preprint". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373487.
@article{osti_1373487,
title = {Multi-Megawatt-Scale Power-Hardware-in-the-Loop Interface for Testing Ancillary Grid Services by Converter-Coupled Generation: Preprint},
author = {Koralewicz, Przemyslaw J and Gevorgian, Vahan and Wallen, Robert B},
abstractNote = {Power-hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) is a simulation tool that can support electrical systems engineers in the development and experimental validation of novel, advanced control schemes that ensure the robustness and resiliency of electrical grids that have high penetrations of low-inertia variable renewable resources. With PHIL, the impact of the device under test on a generation or distribution system can be analyzed using a real-time simulator (RTS). PHIL allows for the interconnection of the RTS with a 7 megavolt ampere (MVA) power amplifier to test multi-megawatt renewable assets available at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). This paper addresses issues related to the development of a PHIL interface that allows testing hardware devices at actual scale. In particular, the novel PHIL interface algorithm and high-speed digital interface, which minimize the critical loop delay, are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Power-hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) is a simulation tool that can support electrical systems engineers in the development and experimental validation of novel, advanced control schemes that ensure the robustness and resiliency of electrical grids that have high penetrations of low-inertia variable renewable resources. With PHIL, the impact of the device under test on a generation or distribution system can be analyzed using a real-time simulator (RTS). PHIL allows for the interconnection of the RTS with a 7 megavolt ampere (MVA) power amplifier to test multi-megawatt renewable assets available at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). This paper addresses issues related to themore » development of a PHIL interface that allows testing hardware devices at actual scale. In particular, the novel PHIL interface algorithm and high-speed digital interface, which minimize the critical loop delay, are discussed.« less
  • The rapid expansion of wind power has led many transmission system operators to demand modern wind power plants to comply with strict interconnection requirements. Such requirements involve various aspects of wind power plant operation, including fault ride-through and power quality performance as well as the provision of ancillary services to enhance grid reliability. During recent years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of the U.S. Department of Energy has developed a new, groundbreaking testing apparatus and methodology to test and demonstrate many existing and future advanced controls for wind generation (and other renewable generation technologies) on the multimegawatt scale andmore » medium-voltage levels. This paper describes the capabilities and control features of NREL's 7-MVA power electronic grid simulator (also called a controllable grid interface, or CGI) that enables testing many active and reactive power control features of modern wind turbine generators -- including inertial response, primary and secondary frequency responses, and voltage regulation -- under a controlled, medium-voltage grid environment. In particular, this paper focuses on the specifics of testing the balanced and unbalanced fault ride-through characteristics of wind turbine generators under simulated strong and weak medium-voltage grid conditions. In addition, this paper provides insights on the power hardware-in-the-loop feature implemented in the CGI to emulate (in real time) the conditions that might exist in various types of electric power systems under normal operations and/or contingency scenarios. Using actual test examples and simulation results, this paper describes the value of CGI as an ultimate modeling validation tool for all types of 'grid-friendly' controls by wind generation.« less
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  • Grid integration testing of inverter-coupled renewable energy technologies is an essential step in the qualification of renewable energy and energy storage systems to ensure the stability of the power system. New types of devices must be thoroughly tested and validated for compliance with relevant grid codes and interconnection requirements. For this purpose, highly specialized custom-made testing equipment is needed to emulate various types of realistic grid conditions that are required by certification bodies or for research purposes. For testing multi-megawatt converters, a high power grid simulator capable of creating controlled grid conditions and meeting both power quality and dynamic characteristicsmore » is needed. This paper describes the new grid simulator concept based on ABB's medium voltage ACS6000 drive technology that utilizes advanced modulation and control techniques to create an unique testing platform for various multi-megawatt power converter systems. Its performance is demonstrated utilizing the test results obtained during commissioning activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado, USA.« less
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