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Title: Metal Hydride Compression

Abstract

Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H 2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy withmore » hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H 2) gas compressor with a feed pressure of >50 bar and a delivery pressure ≥ 875 bar of high purity H 2 gas using the scheme shown in Figure 1. Progress to date includes the selection of two candidate metal hydrides for each compressor stage, supplier engagement and synthesis of small samples, and the beginning of in-depth characterization of their thermodynamics, kinetics, and hydrogen capacities for optimal performance with respect to energy requirements and efficiency. Additionally, bed design trade studies are underway and will be finalized in FY18. Subsequently, the prototype two-stage compressor will be fabricated, assembled and experimentally evaluated in FY19.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fuel Cell Technologies Office (EE-3F)
OSTI Identifier:
1373472
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-7791R
655596
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN

Citation Formats

Johnson, Terry A., Bowman, Robert, Smith, Barton, Anovitz, Lawrence, and Jensen, Craig. Metal Hydride Compression. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1373472.
Johnson, Terry A., Bowman, Robert, Smith, Barton, Anovitz, Lawrence, & Jensen, Craig. Metal Hydride Compression. United States. doi:10.2172/1373472.
Johnson, Terry A., Bowman, Robert, Smith, Barton, Anovitz, Lawrence, and Jensen, Craig. Sat . "Metal Hydride Compression". United States. doi:10.2172/1373472. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373472.
@article{osti_1373472,
title = {Metal Hydride Compression},
author = {Johnson, Terry A. and Bowman, Robert and Smith, Barton and Anovitz, Lawrence and Jensen, Craig},
abstractNote = {Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a feed pressure of >50 bar and a delivery pressure ≥ 875 bar of high purity H2 gas using the scheme shown in Figure 1. Progress to date includes the selection of two candidate metal hydrides for each compressor stage, supplier engagement and synthesis of small samples, and the beginning of in-depth characterization of their thermodynamics, kinetics, and hydrogen capacities for optimal performance with respect to energy requirements and efficiency. Additionally, bed design trade studies are underway and will be finalized in FY18. Subsequently, the prototype two-stage compressor will be fabricated, assembled and experimentally evaluated in FY19.},
doi = {10.2172/1373472},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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