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Title: Beating Darwin-Bragg losses in lab-based ultrafast x-ray experiments

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [5];  [5];  [5];  [6];  [6];  [6];  [6];  [6]
  1. Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, Box 124, Lund SE-22100, Sweden, Department of Applied Mathematics, RSPE, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
  2. Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, Box 124, Lund SE-22100, Sweden
  3. Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, Box 124, Lund SE-22100, Sweden, Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, WB, India
  4. Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, Box 124, Lund SE-22100, Sweden, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
  5. Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyväskylä, Finland
  6. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1373444
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Structural Dynamics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 11:49:09; Journal ID: ISSN 2329-7778
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Fullagar, Wilfred K., Uhlig, Jens, Mandal, Ujjwal, Kurunthu, Dharmalingam, El Nahhas, Amal, Tatsuno, Hideyuki, Honarfar, Alireza, Parnefjord Gustafsson, Fredrik, Sundström, Villy, Palosaari, Mikko R. J., Kinnunen, Kimmo M., Maasilta, Ilari J., Miaja-Avila, Luis, O'Neil, Galen C., Joe, Young Il, Swetz, Daniel S., and Ullom, Joel N.. Beating Darwin-Bragg losses in lab-based ultrafast x-ray experiments. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4978742.
Fullagar, Wilfred K., Uhlig, Jens, Mandal, Ujjwal, Kurunthu, Dharmalingam, El Nahhas, Amal, Tatsuno, Hideyuki, Honarfar, Alireza, Parnefjord Gustafsson, Fredrik, Sundström, Villy, Palosaari, Mikko R. J., Kinnunen, Kimmo M., Maasilta, Ilari J., Miaja-Avila, Luis, O'Neil, Galen C., Joe, Young Il, Swetz, Daniel S., & Ullom, Joel N.. Beating Darwin-Bragg losses in lab-based ultrafast x-ray experiments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978742.
Fullagar, Wilfred K., Uhlig, Jens, Mandal, Ujjwal, Kurunthu, Dharmalingam, El Nahhas, Amal, Tatsuno, Hideyuki, Honarfar, Alireza, Parnefjord Gustafsson, Fredrik, Sundström, Villy, Palosaari, Mikko R. J., Kinnunen, Kimmo M., Maasilta, Ilari J., Miaja-Avila, Luis, O'Neil, Galen C., Joe, Young Il, Swetz, Daniel S., and Ullom, Joel N.. Sat . "Beating Darwin-Bragg losses in lab-based ultrafast x-ray experiments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978742.
@article{osti_1373444,
title = {Beating Darwin-Bragg losses in lab-based ultrafast x-ray experiments},
author = {Fullagar, Wilfred K. and Uhlig, Jens and Mandal, Ujjwal and Kurunthu, Dharmalingam and El Nahhas, Amal and Tatsuno, Hideyuki and Honarfar, Alireza and Parnefjord Gustafsson, Fredrik and Sundström, Villy and Palosaari, Mikko R. J. and Kinnunen, Kimmo M. and Maasilta, Ilari J. and Miaja-Avila, Luis and O'Neil, Galen C. and Joe, Young Il and Swetz, Daniel S. and Ullom, Joel N.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4978742},
journal = {Structural Dynamics},
number = 4,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4978742

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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