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Title: Light-responsive organic flashing electron ratchet

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1373423
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0000989
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 33; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-14 13:54:30; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kedem, Ofer, Lau, Bryan, Ratner, Mark A., and Weiss, Emily A.. Light-responsive organic flashing electron ratchet. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1705973114.
Kedem, Ofer, Lau, Bryan, Ratner, Mark A., & Weiss, Emily A.. Light-responsive organic flashing electron ratchet. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1705973114.
Kedem, Ofer, Lau, Bryan, Ratner, Mark A., and Weiss, Emily A.. 2017. "Light-responsive organic flashing electron ratchet". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1705973114.
@article{osti_1373423,
title = {Light-responsive organic flashing electron ratchet},
author = {Kedem, Ofer and Lau, Bryan and Ratner, Mark A. and Weiss, Emily A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1705973114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 33,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1073/pnas.1705973114

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
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