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Title: NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

Abstract

The certification of a new standard reference material for small-angle scattering [NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)], based on glassy carbon, is presented. Creation of this SRM relies on the intrinsic primary calibration capabilities of the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering technique. This article describes how the intensity calibration has been achieved and validated in the certified Q range, Q = 0.008–0.25 Å –1, together with the purpose, use and availability of the SRM. The intensity calibration afforded by this robust and stable SRM should be applicable universally to all SAXS instruments that employ a transmission measurement geometry, working with a wide range of X-ray energies or wavelengths. As a result, the validation of the SRM SAXS intensity calibration using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is discussed, together with the prospects for including SANS in a future renewal certification.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); US Department of Commerce
OSTI Identifier:
1373412
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online); Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1600-5767
Publisher:
International Union of Crystallography
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; absolute scattering intensity calibration; glassy carbon; small-angle X-ray scattering; standard reference materials

Citation Formats

Allen, Andrew J., Zhang, Fan, Kline, R. Joseph, Guthrie, William F., and Ilavsky, Jan. NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1107/S1600576717001972.
Allen, Andrew J., Zhang, Fan, Kline, R. Joseph, Guthrie, William F., & Ilavsky, Jan. NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering. United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576717001972.
Allen, Andrew J., Zhang, Fan, Kline, R. Joseph, Guthrie, William F., and Ilavsky, Jan. Tue . "NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering". United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576717001972. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373412.
@article{osti_1373412,
title = {NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering},
author = {Allen, Andrew J. and Zhang, Fan and Kline, R. Joseph and Guthrie, William F. and Ilavsky, Jan},
abstractNote = {The certification of a new standard reference material for small-angle scattering [NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)], based on glassy carbon, is presented. Creation of this SRM relies on the intrinsic primary calibration capabilities of the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering technique. This article describes how the intensity calibration has been achieved and validated in the certified Q range, Q = 0.008–0.25 Å–1, together with the purpose, use and availability of the SRM. The intensity calibration afforded by this robust and stable SRM should be applicable universally to all SAXS instruments that employ a transmission measurement geometry, working with a wide range of X-ray energies or wavelengths. As a result, the validation of the SRM SAXS intensity calibration using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is discussed, together with the prospects for including SANS in a future renewal certification.},
doi = {10.1107/S1600576717001972},
journal = {Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
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