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Title: New materials for high-energy-resolution x-ray optics

Abstract

The use of crystals other than silicon for x-ray optics is becoming more common for many challenging experiments such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and nuclear resonant scattering. As more—and more specialized—spectrometers become available at many synchrotron radiation facilities, interest in pushing the limits of experimental energy resolution has increased. The potentially large improvements in resolution and efficiency that nonsilicon optics offer are beginning to be realized. Furthermore, this article covers the background and state of the art for nonsilicon crystal optics with a focus on a resolution of 10 meV or better, concentrating on compounds that form trigonal crystals, including sapphire, quartz, and lithium niobate, rather than the more conventional cubic materials, including silicon, diamond, and germanium.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)
  2. Diamond Light Source Ltd. (United Kingdom)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  4. RIKEN SPring-8 Center (Japan)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22), Scientific User Facilities Division
OSTI Identifier:
1373409
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
MRS Bulletin
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 06; Journal ID: ISSN 0883-7694
Publisher:
Materials Research Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; crystal; inelastic x-ray scattering; lithium niobate; nuclear resonant scattering; quartz; sapphire; silicon

Citation Formats

Yavas, Hasan, Sutter, John P., Gog, Thomas, Wille, Hans -Christian, and Baron, Alfred Q. R. New materials for high-energy-resolution x-ray optics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.94.
Yavas, Hasan, Sutter, John P., Gog, Thomas, Wille, Hans -Christian, & Baron, Alfred Q. R. New materials for high-energy-resolution x-ray optics. United States. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.94.
Yavas, Hasan, Sutter, John P., Gog, Thomas, Wille, Hans -Christian, and Baron, Alfred Q. R. 2017. "New materials for high-energy-resolution x-ray optics". United States. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.94.
@article{osti_1373409,
title = {New materials for high-energy-resolution x-ray optics},
author = {Yavas, Hasan and Sutter, John P. and Gog, Thomas and Wille, Hans -Christian and Baron, Alfred Q. R.},
abstractNote = {The use of crystals other than silicon for x-ray optics is becoming more common for many challenging experiments such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and nuclear resonant scattering. As more—and more specialized—spectrometers become available at many synchrotron radiation facilities, interest in pushing the limits of experimental energy resolution has increased. The potentially large improvements in resolution and efficiency that nonsilicon optics offer are beginning to be realized. Furthermore, this article covers the background and state of the art for nonsilicon crystal optics with a focus on a resolution of 10 meV or better, concentrating on compounds that form trigonal crystals, including sapphire, quartz, and lithium niobate, rather than the more conventional cubic materials, including silicon, diamond, and germanium.},
doi = {10.1557/mrs.2017.94},
journal = {MRS Bulletin},
number = 06,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 9, 2018
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  • Owing to the depth to which hard X-rays penetrate into most materials, it is commonly accepted that the only way to realize hard-X-ray mirrors with near 100% reflectance is under conditions of total external reflection at grazing incidence to a surface. At angles away from grazing incidence, substantial reflectance of hard X-rays occurs only as a result of constructive interference of the waves scattered from periodically ordered atomic planes in crystals (Bragg diffraction). Theory predicts that even at normal incidence the reflection of X-rays from diamond under the Bragg condition should approach 100% - substantially higher than from any othermore » crystal. Here we demonstrate that commercially produced synthetic diamond crystals do indeed show an unprecedented reflecting power at normal incidence and millielectronvolt-narrow reflection bandwidths for hard X-rays. Bragg diffraction measurements of reflectivity and the energy bandwidth show remarkable agreement with theory. Such properties are valuable to the development of hard-X-ray optics, and could greatly assist the realization of fully coherent X-ray sources, such as X-ray free-electron laser oscillators.« less