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Title: Exploring Demand Charge Savings from Residential Solar

Abstract

We use simulated load and PV generation profiles, based on 17 years of weather data for 15 cities, We use simulated load and PV generation profiles, based on 17 years of weather data for 15 cities.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1373280
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1007030
ir:1007030
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY

Citation Formats

Darghouth, Naim, Barbose, Galen, Mills, Andrew, Wiser, Ryan, Gagnon, Pieter, and Bird, Lori. Exploring Demand Charge Savings from Residential Solar. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1373280.
Darghouth, Naim, Barbose, Galen, Mills, Andrew, Wiser, Ryan, Gagnon, Pieter, & Bird, Lori. Exploring Demand Charge Savings from Residential Solar. United States. doi:10.2172/1373280.
Darghouth, Naim, Barbose, Galen, Mills, Andrew, Wiser, Ryan, Gagnon, Pieter, and Bird, Lori. 2017. "Exploring Demand Charge Savings from Residential Solar". United States. doi:10.2172/1373280. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373280.
@article{osti_1373280,
title = {Exploring Demand Charge Savings from Residential Solar},
author = {Darghouth, Naim and Barbose, Galen and Mills, Andrew and Wiser, Ryan and Gagnon, Pieter and Bird, Lori},
abstractNote = {We use simulated load and PV generation profiles, based on 17 years of weather data for 15 cities, We use simulated load and PV generation profiles, based on 17 years of weather data for 15 cities.},
doi = {10.2172/1373280},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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