skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Effects of Cooling Rate on 6.5% Silicon Steel Ordering

Abstract

Increasing Si content improves magnetic and electrical properties of electrical steel, with 6.5% Si as the optimum. Unfortunately, when Si content approaches 5.7%, the Fe-Si alloy becomes brittle. At 6.5%, the steel conventional cold rolling process is no longer applicable. The heterogeneous formation of B2 and D03 ordered phases is responsible for the embrittlement. The formation of these ordered phases can be impeded by rapid cooling. However, only the cooling rates of water and brine water were investigated. A comprehensive study of the effect of rapid cooling rate on the formation of the ordered phases was carried out by varying wheel speed and melt-injection rate. Thermal imaging employed to measure cooling rates while microstructures of the obtained ribbons are characterized using X-ray diffraction and TEM. The electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties are characterized using 4-pt probe, VSM, and macro-indentation methods. The relations between physical properties and ordered phases are established.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [3]
  1. Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  2. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  3. Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
  4. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Iowa State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
Contributing Org.:
Iowa State University
OSTI Identifier:
1373274
DOE Contract Number:
EE0007794
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: TMS 2017 Conference; Conference: TMS 2017, San Diego, 2/26-3/2/2018
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Electrical steel

Citation Formats

Cui, Jun, Macziewski, Chad, Jensen, Brandt, Ouyang, Gaoyuan, Zhou, Lin, Dennis, Kevin, Zarkevich, Nikolai, Jiang, Xiujuan, Tang, Wei, Zhou, Shihuai, Simsek, Emrah, Napolitano, Ralph, and Kramer, Matt. Effects of Cooling Rate on 6.5% Silicon Steel Ordering. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Cui, Jun, Macziewski, Chad, Jensen, Brandt, Ouyang, Gaoyuan, Zhou, Lin, Dennis, Kevin, Zarkevich, Nikolai, Jiang, Xiujuan, Tang, Wei, Zhou, Shihuai, Simsek, Emrah, Napolitano, Ralph, & Kramer, Matt. Effects of Cooling Rate on 6.5% Silicon Steel Ordering. United States.
Cui, Jun, Macziewski, Chad, Jensen, Brandt, Ouyang, Gaoyuan, Zhou, Lin, Dennis, Kevin, Zarkevich, Nikolai, Jiang, Xiujuan, Tang, Wei, Zhou, Shihuai, Simsek, Emrah, Napolitano, Ralph, and Kramer, Matt. Thu . "Effects of Cooling Rate on 6.5% Silicon Steel Ordering". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373274.
@article{osti_1373274,
title = {Effects of Cooling Rate on 6.5% Silicon Steel Ordering},
author = {Cui, Jun and Macziewski, Chad and Jensen, Brandt and Ouyang, Gaoyuan and Zhou, Lin and Dennis, Kevin and Zarkevich, Nikolai and Jiang, Xiujuan and Tang, Wei and Zhou, Shihuai and Simsek, Emrah and Napolitano, Ralph and Kramer, Matt},
abstractNote = {Increasing Si content improves magnetic and electrical properties of electrical steel, with 6.5% Si as the optimum. Unfortunately, when Si content approaches 5.7%, the Fe-Si alloy becomes brittle. At 6.5%, the steel conventional cold rolling process is no longer applicable. The heterogeneous formation of B2 and D03 ordered phases is responsible for the embrittlement. The formation of these ordered phases can be impeded by rapid cooling. However, only the cooling rates of water and brine water were investigated. A comprehensive study of the effect of rapid cooling rate on the formation of the ordered phases was carried out by varying wheel speed and melt-injection rate. Thermal imaging employed to measure cooling rates while microstructures of the obtained ribbons are characterized using X-ray diffraction and TEM. The electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties are characterized using 4-pt probe, VSM, and macro-indentation methods. The relations between physical properties and ordered phases are established.},
doi = {},
journal = {TMS 2017 Conference},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • Carl Wieman presents a talk at Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics and Energy Science, a scientific symposium honoring Steve Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics. The symposium was held August 30, 2008 in Berkeley.
  • Steve Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize, presents a talk at Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics and Energy Science, a scientific symposium in his honor. The symposium was held August 30, 2008 in Berkeley.
  • The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. Himanshu Pokharna,more » Vice President of Sheetak Uttam Ghoshal, President and CEO of Sheetak.« less
  • All camera angled view of the implosion of the K Cooling Tower at the Savannah River Site.
  • At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven Lab, nuclei of gold atoms are collided with enough force to recreate on a tiny scale the hot, dense conditions that existed about one-hundredth of a second after the Big Bang. By packing so much energy into a small area, these collisions allow physicists to study fundamental constituents of matter -- quarks and gluons -- in a state of matter that last existed some 14 billion years ago. RHIC's current collision rate -- its luminosity -- is thousands of collisions per second. But RHIC physicists want more because the more collisions, themore » more data they can take and the more analysis they can do toward understanding the forces causing these subatomic particles to interact and coalesce to form the universe as it is today. One approach to achieving higher collision rates is called stochastic cooling, which is an accelerator beam-feedback technique to keep an accelerator's particle beam size as small as possible. Although this approach has been used in specialized, low-energy accelerators, it has never been made to work at high energy of with tightly bunched beams such as RHIC's -- until now. After defining stochastic cooling concepts and techniques, the lecturer will describe how the stochastic cooling system that began operating at RHIC last year has significantly reduced the energy spread of beams. And he will talk about plans to build upon this success by installing another system by next fall.« less