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Title: High pressure resonant X-ray emission studies of WO and hydrogenated WO

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. (CIW)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE-NNSAUNIVERSITY
OSTI Identifier:
1372917
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 17th Int Conf on High Pressure in Semiconductor Physics ;Aug. 7-11, 2016;Tokyo, Japan
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Pravica, Michael, Wang, Yonggang, Xiao, Yuming, Chow, Paul, Wang, Yonggang, Xiao, Yuming, Chow, Paul, and UNLV). High pressure resonant X-ray emission studies of WO and hydrogenated WO. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.7567/JJAPCP.6.011102.
Pravica, Michael, Wang, Yonggang, Xiao, Yuming, Chow, Paul, Wang, Yonggang, Xiao, Yuming, Chow, Paul, & UNLV). High pressure resonant X-ray emission studies of WO and hydrogenated WO. United States. doi:10.7567/JJAPCP.6.011102.
Pravica, Michael, Wang, Yonggang, Xiao, Yuming, Chow, Paul, Wang, Yonggang, Xiao, Yuming, Chow, Paul, and UNLV). 2017. "High pressure resonant X-ray emission studies of WO and hydrogenated WO". United States. doi:10.7567/JJAPCP.6.011102.
@article{osti_1372917,
title = {High pressure resonant X-ray emission studies of WO and hydrogenated WO},
author = {Pravica, Michael and Wang, Yonggang and Xiao, Yuming and Chow, Paul and Wang, Yonggang and Xiao, Yuming and Chow, Paul and UNLV)},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.7567/JJAPCP.6.011102},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • No abstract prepared.
  • A laser-heated diamond anvil cell system has been designed and implemented for nuclear resonant scattering at beamline 3-ID of the Advance Photon Source. A stable sample temperature up to 1700K was maintained with a variation of {+-} 100K for more than 10 hours. This gives us a unique capability to study magnetic, elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of materials using nuclear resonant scattering under simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature conditions. The details of the system design will be presented and some experimental applications will be discussed in this paper.
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  • The 16O({alpha},{alpha})16O resonance at 8.8 MeV was used to determine the oxidation rates of Y implanted Cu, Mo and Ta. At back angles this resonance has an uniform cross section of {approx} 25 times the coulomb cross section over an energy range of {approx} 0.6 MeV, allowing the surface oxidation of metals to be easily determined without the necessity of weighing the samples. Oxidations were made at 200{degree}C, 400{degree}C and 500{degree}C for Cu, Mo and Ta respectively and for times ranging from 10 min to 10 h. At short times the oxidation is enhanced in the Y implanted materials asmore » compared to unimplanted materials. However, as the oxidation times increase the oxidation rate in the implanted materials fall, and in the case of Cu and Ta the total amount of oxygen in the implanted samples eventually becomes lower than that of the unimplanted samples. In all cases Y implantation strongly effects the oxidation process. For Ta and Cu retardation of grain boundary oxidation occurs. For Mo, implantation produces a discrete oxide layer which grows in a layer-by-layer manner. These data indicate that the Y-Cu and the Y-Ta oxides are more passivating than their unimplanted counterparts.« less