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Title: Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

Abstract

This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1372807
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-26202
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; plutonium-238; plutonium-239; PuO2; plutonium oxide

Citation Formats

Shores, Erik Frederick. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1372807.
Shores, Erik Frederick. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide. United States. doi:10.2172/1372807.
Shores, Erik Frederick. Mon . "Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide". United States. doi:10.2172/1372807. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1372807.
@article{osti_1372807,
title = {Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide},
author = {Shores, Erik Frederick},
abstractNote = {This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.},
doi = {10.2172/1372807},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In irradiated fuel processing plants, the personnel concerned with radloprotection often require a rapid estimation of the equivalent dose rates due to neutrons emitted by plutonium or plutonium compound sources (sources having different physical and geometrical characteristics). GraphPS are presented which facilitate rapid determinations. Expressions enabling the specific emissions of Pu or Pu compound sources to be calculated are given, the contribution of the flssion neutrons produced being taken into consideration. This Pu can arise from fuels having different physical characteristics. As an example of the application of the techniques outlined, graphs enabling the equivalent dose rates to be evaluatedmore » in contact with xx at some distance from sources of Pu metal or Pu oxide or fluoride are presented, the Pu being obtained natural U rods having been irradiated at different burn up in uranium-graphite-gas type reactors.« less
  • The fast neutron, gamma and X-ray does rates from various mixtures of plutonium oxide and beryllium oxide were measured and compared with theoretical estimates of fast neutron emission. The results obtained have been used to estimate the radiological hazard that may be encountered in the small scale manufacture of plutonium oxide - beryllium oxide fuel pellets. (auth)
  • Emissions inventories for the eastern United States indicate that Maryland is responsible for only 2 to 3% of the total emissions in the five-state area encompassing Maryland. For nitrogen, anthropogenic emissions in Maryland account for 11% of those in the five-state region. Two circumstances suggest that the bulk of the deposited sulfate is produced outside Maryland: 1) easterly transport winds in Maryland are relatively infrequent; 2) elevated sulfate concentrations in rain observed at Deep Creek are frequently associated with winds from the northwest. A review of the evidence indicates that on the average, local and deposition due to isolated powermore » plants will increase sulfate and hydrogen ion deposition by no more than 10% annually within a 30-km radius of the plant (equivalent to a pH depression of 0.1 unit). However, locally greater deposition may occur at specific locations that are frequently impacted by rain traversing the plume.« less
  • Progress is reportd in the following tasks: Task C, Measure transmission of UO/sub 2/ powder through leaks (single orifice or capillary experiments and experiments with leakpaths above and below powder level were conducted); Task E, Investigate PuO/sub 2/ leaks through simulated and defected containers (room-temperature simulated crack experiments were conducted at helium flow rates of 11.4, 9.8, 11.6, and 13.2 cc/s). (9 figs, 5 tables) (DLC)
  • Progress to date is summarized on five tasks: (1) review literature and theoretical work relating to transmission of particles through channels, (2) investigate the relationship of gas flow rates, leak geometries, pressure, and temperatures, (3) measure transmission of a well characterized simulant (UO/sub 2/ powder) through leaks, (4) measure fuel grade PuO/sub 2/ leaks through a standard leak, and (5) investigate PuO/sub 2/ leaks through simulated and defected containers.