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Title: Turbines, Wind Tunnels, and Teamwork: The 2017 Collegiate Wind Competition Technical Challenge

Abstract

Ten college teams put their turbines to the test at the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2017 Collegiate Wind Competition Technical Challenge, held April 20–22 at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The competition showcased a wide variety of turbine designs and highlighted the competitors’ brilliance, agility, and ingenuity. College students weren’t the only future wind energy experts at the NWTC that weekend: elementary and middle school students tested their turbines—crafted creatively from materials like soda bottles and aluminum foil—in the Colorado KidWind Challenge.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1372662
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; WIND TUNNEL; NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER; TURBINES; COLORADO KIDWIND CHALLENGE

Citation Formats

None. Turbines, Wind Tunnels, and Teamwork: The 2017 Collegiate Wind Competition Technical Challenge. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. Turbines, Wind Tunnels, and Teamwork: The 2017 Collegiate Wind Competition Technical Challenge. United States.
None. 2017. "Turbines, Wind Tunnels, and Teamwork: The 2017 Collegiate Wind Competition Technical Challenge". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1372662.
@article{osti_1372662,
title = {Turbines, Wind Tunnels, and Teamwork: The 2017 Collegiate Wind Competition Technical Challenge},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Ten college teams put their turbines to the test at the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2017 Collegiate Wind Competition Technical Challenge, held April 20–22 at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The competition showcased a wide variety of turbine designs and highlighted the competitors’ brilliance, agility, and ingenuity. College students weren’t the only future wind energy experts at the NWTC that weekend: elementary and middle school students tested their turbines—crafted creatively from materials like soda bottles and aluminum foil—in the Colorado KidWind Challenge.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
  • In this short documentary, we follow three collegiate teams who are participating in this year’s U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Wind Competition in New Orleans. Learn about their experiences and why the competition is important for America’s clean energy future. The competition provides undergraduates with real-world skills they need to enter tomorrow’s clean energy workforce by challenging them to develop and deliver a business plan, establish a deployment strategy, and build and test a wind turbine.
  • The U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Wind Competition prepares students from multiple disciplines to enter tomorrow’s wind energy workforce. As part of the competition, undergraduate students build and test a wind turbine, establish a deployment strategy, and develop and deliver a business plan.
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