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Title: Fuel from Algae in Space? NREL Helps Colorado Students with Out-of-this-World Project

Abstract

An unusual project undertaken by students at Chatfield High School in Colorado might be just what America’s space program needs. The students want to see if we can create fuel from algae in space. To do so, they're sending two strains of algae supplied by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory into orbit aboard the International Space Station. Earth-bound experiments have already shown one strain produces hydrogen, which can be used to power fuel cells, while the end result for the other is a biofuel. If all goes well, these science-minded students could wind up making it easier for long-duration space voyages.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1372654
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; MARS; ALGAE; SPACE; ALGAE INTO ORBIT

Citation Formats

None. Fuel from Algae in Space? NREL Helps Colorado Students with Out-of-this-World Project. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. Fuel from Algae in Space? NREL Helps Colorado Students with Out-of-this-World Project. United States.
None. 2017. "Fuel from Algae in Space? NREL Helps Colorado Students with Out-of-this-World Project". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1372654.
@article{osti_1372654,
title = {Fuel from Algae in Space? NREL Helps Colorado Students with Out-of-this-World Project},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {An unusual project undertaken by students at Chatfield High School in Colorado might be just what America’s space program needs. The students want to see if we can create fuel from algae in space. To do so, they're sending two strains of algae supplied by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory into orbit aboard the International Space Station. Earth-bound experiments have already shown one strain produces hydrogen, which can be used to power fuel cells, while the end result for the other is a biofuel. If all goes well, these science-minded students could wind up making it easier for long-duration space voyages.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
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