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Title: Predicting 3D Additive Manufacturing Microstructures with Potts Kinetic Monte Carlo.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1372603
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-6855C
645689
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the The 3rd International Conference on 3D Materials Science 2016 held July 10-13, 2016 in St Charles, IL.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rodgers, Theron, Madison, Jonathan D, and Tikare, Veena. Predicting 3D Additive Manufacturing Microstructures with Potts Kinetic Monte Carlo.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Rodgers, Theron, Madison, Jonathan D, & Tikare, Veena. Predicting 3D Additive Manufacturing Microstructures with Potts Kinetic Monte Carlo.. United States.
Rodgers, Theron, Madison, Jonathan D, and Tikare, Veena. 2016. "Predicting 3D Additive Manufacturing Microstructures with Potts Kinetic Monte Carlo.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1372603.
@article{osti_1372603,
title = {Predicting 3D Additive Manufacturing Microstructures with Potts Kinetic Monte Carlo.},
author = {Rodgers, Theron and Madison, Jonathan D and Tikare, Veena},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Abstract not provided.
  • Additive manufacturing (AM) is of tremendous interest given its ability to realize complex, non-traditional geometries in engineered structural materials. But, microstructures generated from AM processes can be equally, if not more, complex than their conventionally processed counterparts. While some microstructural features observed in AM may also occur in more traditional solidification processes, the introduction of spatially and temporally mobile heat sources can result in significant microstructural heterogeneity. While grain size and shape in metal AM structures are understood to be highly dependent on both local and global temperature profiles, the exact form of this relation is not well understood. Wemore » implement an idealized molten zone and temperature-dependent grain boundary mobility in a kinetic Monte Carlo model to predict three-dimensional grain structure in additively manufactured metals. In order to demonstrate the flexibility of the model, synthetic microstructures are generated under conditions mimicking relatively diverse experimental results present in the literature. Simulated microstructures are then qualitatively and quantitatively compared to their experimental complements and are shown to be in good agreement.« less
  • Additive manufacturing (AM) is of tremendous interest given its ability to realize complex, non-traditional geometries in engineered structural materials. But, microstructures generated from AM processes can be equally, if not more, complex than their conventionally processed counterparts. While some microstructural features observed in AM may also occur in more traditional solidification processes, the introduction of spatially and temporally mobile heat sources can result in significant microstructural heterogeneity. While grain size and shape in metal AM structures are understood to be highly dependent on both local and global temperature profiles, the exact form of this relation is not well understood. Wemore » implement an idealized molten zone and temperature-dependent grain boundary mobility in a kinetic Monte Carlo model to predict three-dimensional grain structure in additively manufactured metals. In order to demonstrate the flexibility of the model, synthetic microstructures are generated under conditions mimicking relatively diverse experimental results present in the literature. Simulated microstructures are then qualitatively and quantitatively compared to their experimental complements and are shown to be in good agreement.« less
  • No abstract prepared.