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Title: Integrated analysis of zone-specific protein and metabolite profiles within nitrogen-fixing Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium medicae nodules

Abstract

Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) between rhizobia and legumes requires metabolic coordination within specialized root organs called nodules. Nodules formed in the symbiosis between S. medicae and barrel medic (M. truncatula) are indeterminate, cylindrical, and contain spatially distinct developmental zones. Bacteria in the infection zone II (ZII), interzone II-III (IZ), and nitrogen fixation zone III (ZIII) represent different stages in the metabolic progression from free-living bacteria into nitrogen fixing bacteroids. To better understand the coordination of plant and bacterial metabolism within the nodule, we used liquid and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS) to observe protein and metabolite profiles representative of ZII, IZ, ZIII, whole-nodule, and primary root. Our MS-based approach confidently identified 361 S. medicae proteins and 888 M. truncatula proteins, as well as 160 metabolites from each tissue. The data are consistent with several organ- and zone-specific protein and metabolite localization patterns characterized previously. Here, we used our comprehensive dataset to demonstrate how multiple branches of primary metabolism are coordinated between symbionts and zones, including central carbon, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism. For example, M. truncatula glycolysis enzymes accumulate from zone I to zone III within the nodule, while equivalent S. medicae enzymes decrease in abundance.more » We also show the localization of S. medicae's transition to dicarboxylic acid-dependent carbon metabolism within the IZ. The spatial abundance patterns of S. medicae fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis enzymes indicate an increased demand for FA production in the IZ and ZIII as compared to ZI. Our observations provide a resource for those seeking to understand coordinated physiological changes during the development of SNF.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Molecular Plant Science Program and Inst. of Biological Chemistry
  2. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry
  3. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Annecy-le-Vieux (France)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1372597
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1392986
Grant/Contract Number:
FG03-96ER20225
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Ogden, Aaron J., Gargouri, Mahmoud, Park, JeongJin, Gang, David R., Kahn, Michael L., and Mergaert, Peter. Integrated analysis of zone-specific protein and metabolite profiles within nitrogen-fixing Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium medicae nodules. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0180894.
Ogden, Aaron J., Gargouri, Mahmoud, Park, JeongJin, Gang, David R., Kahn, Michael L., & Mergaert, Peter. Integrated analysis of zone-specific protein and metabolite profiles within nitrogen-fixing Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium medicae nodules. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0180894.
Ogden, Aaron J., Gargouri, Mahmoud, Park, JeongJin, Gang, David R., Kahn, Michael L., and Mergaert, Peter. Mon . "Integrated analysis of zone-specific protein and metabolite profiles within nitrogen-fixing Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium medicae nodules". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0180894.
@article{osti_1372597,
title = {Integrated analysis of zone-specific protein and metabolite profiles within nitrogen-fixing Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium medicae nodules},
author = {Ogden, Aaron J. and Gargouri, Mahmoud and Park, JeongJin and Gang, David R. and Kahn, Michael L. and Mergaert, Peter},
abstractNote = {Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) between rhizobia and legumes requires metabolic coordination within specialized root organs called nodules. Nodules formed in the symbiosis between S. medicae and barrel medic (M. truncatula) are indeterminate, cylindrical, and contain spatially distinct developmental zones. Bacteria in the infection zone II (ZII), interzone II-III (IZ), and nitrogen fixation zone III (ZIII) represent different stages in the metabolic progression from free-living bacteria into nitrogen fixing bacteroids. To better understand the coordination of plant and bacterial metabolism within the nodule, we used liquid and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS) to observe protein and metabolite profiles representative of ZII, IZ, ZIII, whole-nodule, and primary root. Our MS-based approach confidently identified 361 S. medicae proteins and 888 M. truncatula proteins, as well as 160 metabolites from each tissue. The data are consistent with several organ- and zone-specific protein and metabolite localization patterns characterized previously. Here, we used our comprehensive dataset to demonstrate how multiple branches of primary metabolism are coordinated between symbionts and zones, including central carbon, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism. For example, M. truncatula glycolysis enzymes accumulate from zone I to zone III within the nodule, while equivalent S. medicae enzymes decrease in abundance. We also show the localization of S. medicae's transition to dicarboxylic acid-dependent carbon metabolism within the IZ. The spatial abundance patterns of S. medicae fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis enzymes indicate an increased demand for FA production in the IZ and ZIII as compared to ZI. Our observations provide a resource for those seeking to understand coordinated physiological changes during the development of SNF.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0180894},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 7,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1371/journal.pone.0180894

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  • Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) between rhizobia and legumes requires metabolic coordination within specialized root organs called nodules. Nodules formed in the symbiosis between S. medicae and barrel medic (M. truncatula) are indeterminate, cylindrical, and contain spatially distinct developmental zones. Bacteria in the infection zone II (ZII), interzone II-III (IZ), and nitrogen fixation zone III (ZIII) represent different stages in the metabolic progression from free-living bacteria into nitrogen fixing bacteroids. To better understand the coordination of plant and bacterial metabolism within the nodule, we used liquid and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS) to observe protein and metabolite profilesmore » representative of ZII, IZ, ZIII, whole-nodule, and primary root. Our MS-based approach confidently identified 361 S. medicae proteins and 888 M. truncatula proteins, as well as 160 metabolites from each tissue. The data are consistent with several organ- and zone-specific protein and metabolite localization patterns characterized previously. Here, we used our comprehensive dataset to demonstrate how multiple branches of primary metabolism are coordinated between symbionts and zones, including central carbon, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism. For example, M. truncatula glycolysis enzymes accumulate from zone I to zone III within the nodule, while equivalent S. medicae enzymes decrease in abundance. We also show the localization of S. medicae's transition to dicarboxylic acid-dependent carbon metabolism within the IZ. The spatial abundance patterns of S. medicae fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis enzymes indicate an increased demand for FA production in the IZ and ZIII as compared to ZI. Our observations provide a resource for those seeking to understand coordinated physiological changes during the development of SNF.« less
  • Ensifer ( Sinorhizobium) medicae is an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont of a diverse range of annual Medicago (medic) species. Strain WSM419 is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod isolated from a M. murex root nodule collected in Sardinia, Italy in 1981. WSM419 was manufactured commercially in Australia as an inoculant for annual medics during 1985 to 1993 due to its nitrogen fixation, saprophytic competence and acid tolerance properties. Here we describe the basic features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report of a complete genome sequence for a microsymbiont ofmore » the group of annual medic species adapted to acid soils. We reveal that its genome size is 6,817,576 bp encoding 6,518 protein-coding genes and 81 RNA only encoding genes. The genome contains a chromosome of size 3,781,904 bp and 3 plasmids of size 1,570,951 bp, 1,245,408 bp and 219,313 bp. Furthermore, the smallest plasmid is a feature unique to this medic microsymbiont.« less
  • Optimization of nitrogen fixation by rhizobia in legumes is a key area of research for sustainable agriculture. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) occurs in specialized organs called nodules and depends on a steady supply of carbon to both plant and bacterial cells. Here we report the functional characterization of a nodule-specific Suc transporter, MtSWEET11 from Medicago truncatula. MtSWEET11 belongs to a clade of plant SWEET proteins that are capable of transporting Suc and play critical roles in pathogen susceptibility. When expressed in mammalian cells, MtSWEET11 transported sucrose (Suc) but not glucose (Glc). The MtSWEET11 gene was found to be expressed inmore » infected root hair cells, and in the meristem, invasion zone, and vasculature of nodules. Expression of an MtSWEET11-GFP fusion protein in nodules resulted in green fluorescence associated with the plasma membrane of uninfected cells and infection thread and symbiosome membranes of infected cells. Two independent Tnt1-insertion sweet11 mutants were uncompromised in SNF. Furthermore, although MtSWEET11 appears to be involved in Suc distribution within nodules, it is not crucial for SNF, probably because other Suc transporters can fulfill its role(s).« less