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Title: Three-dimensional single-cell imaging with X-ray waveguides in the holographic regime

Abstract

X-ray tomography at the level of single biological cells is possible in a low-dose regime, based on full-field holographic recordings, with phase contrast originating from free-space wave propagation. Building upon recent progress in cellular imaging based on the illumination by quasi-point sources provided by X-ray waveguides, here this approach is extended in several ways. First, the phase-retrieval algorithms are extended by an optimized deterministic inversion, based on a multi-distance recording. Second, different advanced forms of iterative phase retrieval are used, operational for single-distance and multi-distance recordings. Results are compared for several different preparations of macrophage cells, for different staining and labelling. As a result, it is shown that phase retrieval is no longer a bottleneck for holographic imaging of cells, and how advanced schemes can be implemented to cope also with high noise and inconsistencies in the data.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Georg-August-Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Inst. for X-ray Physics
  2. Max Planck Inst. for Experimental Medicine and Univ. Medical Center, Gottingen (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1372448
Report Number(s):
BNL-114046-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 2053-2733; ACSAD7; R&D Project: PO011; KC0201060
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Acta Crystallographica. Section A, Foundations and Advances (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Acta Crystallographica. Section A, Foundations and Advances (Online); Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2053-2733
Publisher:
International Union of Crystallography
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; x-ray holography; phase retrieval; x-ray tomography; x-ray waveguides; coherent imaging

Citation Formats

Krenkel, Martin, Toepperwien, Mareike, Alves, Frauke, and Salditt, Tim. Three-dimensional single-cell imaging with X-ray waveguides in the holographic regime. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1107/S2053273317007902.
Krenkel, Martin, Toepperwien, Mareike, Alves, Frauke, & Salditt, Tim. Three-dimensional single-cell imaging with X-ray waveguides in the holographic regime. United States. doi:10.1107/S2053273317007902.
Krenkel, Martin, Toepperwien, Mareike, Alves, Frauke, and Salditt, Tim. Thu . "Three-dimensional single-cell imaging with X-ray waveguides in the holographic regime". United States. doi:10.1107/S2053273317007902. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1372448.
@article{osti_1372448,
title = {Three-dimensional single-cell imaging with X-ray waveguides in the holographic regime},
author = {Krenkel, Martin and Toepperwien, Mareike and Alves, Frauke and Salditt, Tim},
abstractNote = {X-ray tomography at the level of single biological cells is possible in a low-dose regime, based on full-field holographic recordings, with phase contrast originating from free-space wave propagation. Building upon recent progress in cellular imaging based on the illumination by quasi-point sources provided by X-ray waveguides, here this approach is extended in several ways. First, the phase-retrieval algorithms are extended by an optimized deterministic inversion, based on a multi-distance recording. Second, different advanced forms of iterative phase retrieval are used, operational for single-distance and multi-distance recordings. Results are compared for several different preparations of macrophage cells, for different staining and labelling. As a result, it is shown that phase retrieval is no longer a bottleneck for holographic imaging of cells, and how advanced schemes can be implemented to cope also with high noise and inconsistencies in the data.},
doi = {10.1107/S2053273317007902},
journal = {Acta Crystallographica. Section A, Foundations and Advances (Online)},
number = 4,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 29 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 29 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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