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Title: Experimental Determination of Sorption Capacities and Kinetics of Model Materials under Shale Gas Reservior Conditions: CO2-CH4 Mixtures to 125 Degree C.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1372153
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-6729D
645195
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the NETL Shale Gas Project Meeting held July 14, 2016 in Carlsbad , New Mexico.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xiong, Yongliang, Wang, Yifeng, and Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna. Experimental Determination of Sorption Capacities and Kinetics of Model Materials under Shale Gas Reservior Conditions: CO2-CH4 Mixtures to 125 Degree C.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Xiong, Yongliang, Wang, Yifeng, & Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna. Experimental Determination of Sorption Capacities and Kinetics of Model Materials under Shale Gas Reservior Conditions: CO2-CH4 Mixtures to 125 Degree C.. United States.
Xiong, Yongliang, Wang, Yifeng, and Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna. 2016. "Experimental Determination of Sorption Capacities and Kinetics of Model Materials under Shale Gas Reservior Conditions: CO2-CH4 Mixtures to 125 Degree C.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1372153.
@article{osti_1372153,
title = {Experimental Determination of Sorption Capacities and Kinetics of Model Materials under Shale Gas Reservior Conditions: CO2-CH4 Mixtures to 125 Degree C.},
author = {Xiong, Yongliang and Wang, Yifeng and Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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