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Title: Rapid, chemical-free breaking of microfluidic emulsions with a hand-held antistatic gun

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, San Francisco, California 94158, USA
  2. Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, San Francisco, California 94158, USA, Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, 499 Illinois St., San Francisco, California 94158, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1372128
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biomicrofluidics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 19:40:02; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-1058
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Karbaschi, Mohsen, Shahi, Payam, and Abate, Adam R. Rapid, chemical-free breaking of microfluidic emulsions with a hand-held antistatic gun. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4995479.
Karbaschi, Mohsen, Shahi, Payam, & Abate, Adam R. Rapid, chemical-free breaking of microfluidic emulsions with a hand-held antistatic gun. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4995479.
Karbaschi, Mohsen, Shahi, Payam, and Abate, Adam R. Sat . "Rapid, chemical-free breaking of microfluidic emulsions with a hand-held antistatic gun". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4995479.
@article{osti_1372128,
title = {Rapid, chemical-free breaking of microfluidic emulsions with a hand-held antistatic gun},
author = {Karbaschi, Mohsen and Shahi, Payam and Abate, Adam R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4995479},
journal = {Biomicrofluidics},
number = 4,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4995479

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