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Title: Steady-State Plant Model to Predict Hydroden Levels in Power Plant Components

Abstract

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Acciona Energy North America developed a full-plant steady-state computational model that estimates levels of hydrogen in parabolic trough power plant components. The model estimated dissolved hydrogen concentrations in the circulating heat transfer fluid (HTF), and corresponding partial pressures within each component. Additionally for collector field receivers, the model estimated hydrogen pressure in the receiver annuli. The model was developed to estimate long-term equilibrium hydrogen levels in power plant components, and to predict the benefit of hydrogen mitigation strategies for commercial power plants. Specifically, the model predicted reductions in hydrogen levels within the circulating HTF that result from purging hydrogen from the power plant expansion tanks at a specified target rate. Our model predicted hydrogen partial pressures from 8.3 mbar to 9.6 mbar in the power plant components when no mitigation treatment was employed at the expansion tanks. Hydrogen pressures in the receiver annuli were 8.3 to 8.4 mbar. When hydrogen partial pressure was reduced to 0.001 mbar in the expansion tanks, hydrogen pressures in the receiver annuli fell to a range of 0.001 mbar to 0.02 mbar. When hydrogen partial pressure was reduced to 0.3 mbar in the expansion tanks, hydrogen pressures inmore » the receiver annuli fell to a range of 0.25 mbar to 0.28 mbar. Our results show that controlling hydrogen partial pressure in the expansion tanks allows us to reduce and maintain hydrogen pressures in the receiver annuli to any practical level.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1372041
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5500-66771
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at SOLARPACES 2016: International Conference on Concentrating Solar Power and Chemical Energy Systems, 11-14 October 2016, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; concentrating solar power; CSP; HTF; heat transfer fluid; Acciona; modeling

Citation Formats

Glatzmaier, Greg C., Cable, Robert, and Newmarker, Marc. Steady-State Plant Model to Predict Hydroden Levels in Power Plant Components. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4984332.
Glatzmaier, Greg C., Cable, Robert, & Newmarker, Marc. Steady-State Plant Model to Predict Hydroden Levels in Power Plant Components. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4984332.
Glatzmaier, Greg C., Cable, Robert, and Newmarker, Marc. Tue . "Steady-State Plant Model to Predict Hydroden Levels in Power Plant Components". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4984332.
@article{osti_1372041,
title = {Steady-State Plant Model to Predict Hydroden Levels in Power Plant Components},
author = {Glatzmaier, Greg C. and Cable, Robert and Newmarker, Marc},
abstractNote = {The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Acciona Energy North America developed a full-plant steady-state computational model that estimates levels of hydrogen in parabolic trough power plant components. The model estimated dissolved hydrogen concentrations in the circulating heat transfer fluid (HTF), and corresponding partial pressures within each component. Additionally for collector field receivers, the model estimated hydrogen pressure in the receiver annuli. The model was developed to estimate long-term equilibrium hydrogen levels in power plant components, and to predict the benefit of hydrogen mitigation strategies for commercial power plants. Specifically, the model predicted reductions in hydrogen levels within the circulating HTF that result from purging hydrogen from the power plant expansion tanks at a specified target rate. Our model predicted hydrogen partial pressures from 8.3 mbar to 9.6 mbar in the power plant components when no mitigation treatment was employed at the expansion tanks. Hydrogen pressures in the receiver annuli were 8.3 to 8.4 mbar. When hydrogen partial pressure was reduced to 0.001 mbar in the expansion tanks, hydrogen pressures in the receiver annuli fell to a range of 0.001 mbar to 0.02 mbar. When hydrogen partial pressure was reduced to 0.3 mbar in the expansion tanks, hydrogen pressures in the receiver annuli fell to a range of 0.25 mbar to 0.28 mbar. Our results show that controlling hydrogen partial pressure in the expansion tanks allows us to reduce and maintain hydrogen pressures in the receiver annuli to any practical level.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4984332},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Jun 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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