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Title: Diamond x-ray optics: Transparent, resilient, high-resolution, and wavefront preserving

Abstract

Diamond features a unique combination of outstanding physical properties perfect for numerous x-ray optics applications, where traditional materials such as silicon fail to perform. In the last two decades, impressive progress has been achieved in synthesizing diamond with high crystalline perfection, in manufacturing efficient, resilient, high-resolution, wavefront-preserving diamond optical components, and in implementing them in cutting-edge x-ray instruments. Diamond optics are essential for tailoring x-rays to the most challenging needs of x-ray research. Furthermore, they are becoming vital for the generation of fully coherent hard x-rays by seeded x-ray free-electron lasers. In this article, we review progress in manufacturing flawless diamond crystal components and their applications in diverse x-ray optical devices, such as x-ray monochromators, beam splitters, high-reflectance backscattering mirrors, lenses, phase plates, diffraction gratings, bent-crystal spectrographs, and windows.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1371928
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
MRS Bulletin
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 06; Journal ID: ISSN 0883-7694
Publisher:
Materials Research Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; crystal; diamond; optics; x-rays

Citation Formats

Shvyd’ko, Yuri, Blank, Vladimir, and Terentyev, Sergey. Diamond x-ray optics: Transparent, resilient, high-resolution, and wavefront preserving. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.119.
Shvyd’ko, Yuri, Blank, Vladimir, & Terentyev, Sergey. Diamond x-ray optics: Transparent, resilient, high-resolution, and wavefront preserving. United States. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.119.
Shvyd’ko, Yuri, Blank, Vladimir, and Terentyev, Sergey. 2017. "Diamond x-ray optics: Transparent, resilient, high-resolution, and wavefront preserving". United States. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.119.
@article{osti_1371928,
title = {Diamond x-ray optics: Transparent, resilient, high-resolution, and wavefront preserving},
author = {Shvyd’ko, Yuri and Blank, Vladimir and Terentyev, Sergey},
abstractNote = {Diamond features a unique combination of outstanding physical properties perfect for numerous x-ray optics applications, where traditional materials such as silicon fail to perform. In the last two decades, impressive progress has been achieved in synthesizing diamond with high crystalline perfection, in manufacturing efficient, resilient, high-resolution, wavefront-preserving diamond optical components, and in implementing them in cutting-edge x-ray instruments. Diamond optics are essential for tailoring x-rays to the most challenging needs of x-ray research. Furthermore, they are becoming vital for the generation of fully coherent hard x-rays by seeded x-ray free-electron lasers. In this article, we review progress in manufacturing flawless diamond crystal components and their applications in diverse x-ray optical devices, such as x-ray monochromators, beam splitters, high-reflectance backscattering mirrors, lenses, phase plates, diffraction gratings, bent-crystal spectrographs, and windows.},
doi = {10.1557/mrs.2017.119},
journal = {MRS Bulletin},
number = 06,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • When high resolution convection schemes are used for discretizing chemical species mass balance equations, the mass fractions are not guaranteed to add to one. We show that a proposed remedy called χ-scheme (Darwish and Moukalled, Comput.Methods Appl.Mech. Engrg. 192 (2003): 1711) will degrade to a diffusive first-order scheme when a chemical species vanishes from the mixture, for example, because of chemical reactions. We propose an improvement to the χ-scheme to overcome this problem. Furthermore, a computationally efficient alternative scheme is proposed and evaluated with several examples, to quantify the improvements in the accuracy and the computational time.
  • Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, such as NSLS-II and MAX-IV, will offer excellent opportunities for further development of experimental techniques exploiting X-ray coherence. However, even in these new SR sources, the radiation produced by relativistic electrons (in undulators, wigglers and bending magnets) will remain only partiallycoherent in the X-ray spectral range. 'Extraction' of 'coherent portion' of the radiation flux and its transport to sample without loss of coherence must be performed by dedicated SR beamlines, optimized for particular types of experiments. Detailed quantitative prediction of partially coherent X-ray beam properties at propagation through optical elements, which is requiredmore » for the optimization of such beamlines, can only be obtained from accurate and efficient physical-optics based numerical simulations. Examples of such simulations, made for NSLS-II beamlines, using 'Synchrotron Radiation Workshop' (SRW) computer code, are presented. Special attention is paid to the numerical analysis of the basic properties of partially coherent undulator radiation beam and its distinctions from the Gaussian beam. Performance characteristics of importance for particular beamlines, such as radiation spot size and flux at sample vs size of secondary source aperture for high-resolution microscopy beamlines, are predicted by the simulations.« less