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Title: The Birth of the Web at Fermilab

Abstract

Fermilab's website was born in June 1992, thanks in part to Tim Berners-Lee, who invented the World Wide Web in 1989. Fermilab's Ruth Pordes tells the origin story.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1371736
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; WORLD WIDE WEB; MARKUP LANGUAGE; HYPERTEXT; INTERNET CONNECTION

Citation Formats

Pordes, Ruth. The Birth of the Web at Fermilab. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Pordes, Ruth. The Birth of the Web at Fermilab. United States.
Pordes, Ruth. Wed . "The Birth of the Web at Fermilab". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1371736.
@article{osti_1371736,
title = {The Birth of the Web at Fermilab},
author = {Pordes, Ruth},
abstractNote = {Fermilab's website was born in June 1992, thanks in part to Tim Berners-Lee, who invented the World Wide Web in 1989. Fermilab's Ruth Pordes tells the origin story.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Jun 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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