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Title: Fluid Flow Investigations within a 37 Element CANDU Fuel Bundle Supported by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics

Abstract

The current work presents experimental and computational investigations of fluid flow through a 37 element CANDU nuclear fuel bundle. Experiments based on Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) permit three-dimensional, three-component fluid velocity measurements to be made within the bundle with sub-millimeter resolution that are non-intrusive, do not require tracer particles or optical access of the flow field. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of the foregoing experiments were performed with the hydra-th code using implicit large eddy simulation, which were in good agreement with experimental measurements of the fluid velocity. Greater understanding has been gained in the evolution of geometry-induced inter-subchannel mixing, the local effects of obstructed debris on the local flow field, and various turbulent effects, such as recirculation, swirl and separation. These capabilities are not available with conventional experimental techniques or thermal-hydraulic codes. Finally, the overall goal of this work is to continue developing experimental and computational capabilities for further investigations that reliably support nuclear reactor performance and safety.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [5]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6];  [2]
  1. Canadian Nuclear Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Fuel and Fuel Channel Safety Branch
  2. Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Dept. of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics
  3. Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Dept. of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics; Univ. of Rostock (Germany). Inst. of Fluid Mechanics
  4. Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Inst. for Aerospace Sciences
  5. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  6. Canadian Nuclear Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Fuel and Fuel Channel Safety Branch; Univ. of Waterloo, ON (Canada). Computer Science Dept.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1371668
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-27690
Journal ID: ISSN 0142-727X
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 66; Journal ID: ISSN 0142-727X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Energy Sciences; Thermal-hydraulics; subchannel flow; nuclear; magnetic resonance velocimetry; computational fluid dynamics; large eddy simulation.

Citation Formats

Piro, M.H.A, Wassermann, F., Grundmann, S., Tensuda, B., Kim, Seung Jun, Christon, M., Berndt, Markus, Nishimura, M., and Tropea, C.. Fluid Flow Investigations within a 37 Element CANDU Fuel Bundle Supported by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2017.04.010.
Piro, M.H.A, Wassermann, F., Grundmann, S., Tensuda, B., Kim, Seung Jun, Christon, M., Berndt, Markus, Nishimura, M., & Tropea, C.. Fluid Flow Investigations within a 37 Element CANDU Fuel Bundle Supported by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2017.04.010.
Piro, M.H.A, Wassermann, F., Grundmann, S., Tensuda, B., Kim, Seung Jun, Christon, M., Berndt, Markus, Nishimura, M., and Tropea, C.. 2017. "Fluid Flow Investigations within a 37 Element CANDU Fuel Bundle Supported by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2017.04.010.
@article{osti_1371668,
title = {Fluid Flow Investigations within a 37 Element CANDU Fuel Bundle Supported by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics},
author = {Piro, M.H.A and Wassermann, F. and Grundmann, S. and Tensuda, B. and Kim, Seung Jun and Christon, M. and Berndt, Markus and Nishimura, M. and Tropea, C.},
abstractNote = {The current work presents experimental and computational investigations of fluid flow through a 37 element CANDU nuclear fuel bundle. Experiments based on Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) permit three-dimensional, three-component fluid velocity measurements to be made within the bundle with sub-millimeter resolution that are non-intrusive, do not require tracer particles or optical access of the flow field. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of the foregoing experiments were performed with the hydra-th code using implicit large eddy simulation, which were in good agreement with experimental measurements of the fluid velocity. Greater understanding has been gained in the evolution of geometry-induced inter-subchannel mixing, the local effects of obstructed debris on the local flow field, and various turbulent effects, such as recirculation, swirl and separation. These capabilities are not available with conventional experimental techniques or thermal-hydraulic codes. Finally, the overall goal of this work is to continue developing experimental and computational capabilities for further investigations that reliably support nuclear reactor performance and safety.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2017.04.010},
journal = {International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow},
number = ,
volume = 66,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • Abstract not provided.