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Title: In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale

Abstract

Here, a modified version of an in-situ CO 2 removal process was applied during AD of food waste with two types of walnut shell biochar (WSB) at bench-scale under batch operating mode. Compared to the coarse WSB, the fine WSB has a higher ash content (43 vs. 36 wt%) and higher concentrations of calcium (31 vs. 19 wt% of ash), magnesium (8.4 vs. 5.6 wt% of ash) and sodium (23.4 vs. 0.3 wt% of ash), but a lower potassium concentration (0.2 vs. 40% wt% of ash). The 0.96 - 3.83 g biochar (g VS added) -1 fine WSB amended digesters produced biogas with 77.5-98.1% CH 4 content by removing 40-96% of the CO 2 compared to the control digesters at mesophilic and thermophilic temperature conditions. In a direct comparison at 1.83 g biochar (g VS added) -1, the fine WSB amended digesters (85.7% CH 4 content and 61% CO 2 removal) outperformed the coarse WSB amended digesters (78.9% CH 4 content and 51% CO 2 removal). Biochar addition also increased alkalinity as CaCO3 from 2,800 mg L -1 in the control digesters to 4,800-6,800 mg L -1 providing process stability for food waste AD.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
California Energy Commission; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1371563
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Waste Management and Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0734-242X
Publisher:
SAGE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; CO2 removal; renewable methane; anaerobic digestion; biochar; food waste

Citation Formats

Linville, Jessica L., Shen, Yanwen, Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia A., Schoene, Robin P., and Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem. In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1177/0734242X17704716.
Linville, Jessica L., Shen, Yanwen, Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia A., Schoene, Robin P., & Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem. In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale. United States. doi:10.1177/0734242X17704716.
Linville, Jessica L., Shen, Yanwen, Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia A., Schoene, Robin P., and Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem. Wed . "In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale". United States. doi:10.1177/0734242X17704716. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1371563.
@article{osti_1371563,
title = {In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale},
author = {Linville, Jessica L. and Shen, Yanwen and Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia A. and Schoene, Robin P. and Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem},
abstractNote = {Here, a modified version of an in-situ CO2 removal process was applied during AD of food waste with two types of walnut shell biochar (WSB) at bench-scale under batch operating mode. Compared to the coarse WSB, the fine WSB has a higher ash content (43 vs. 36 wt%) and higher concentrations of calcium (31 vs. 19 wt% of ash), magnesium (8.4 vs. 5.6 wt% of ash) and sodium (23.4 vs. 0.3 wt% of ash), but a lower potassium concentration (0.2 vs. 40% wt% of ash). The 0.96 - 3.83 g biochar (g VSadded)-1 fine WSB amended digesters produced biogas with 77.5-98.1% CH4 content by removing 40-96% of the CO2 compared to the control digesters at mesophilic and thermophilic temperature conditions. In a direct comparison at 1.83 g biochar (g VSadded)-1, the fine WSB amended digesters (85.7% CH4 content and 61% CO2 removal) outperformed the coarse WSB amended digesters (78.9% CH4 content and 51% CO2 removal). Biochar addition also increased alkalinity as CaCO3 from 2,800 mg L-1 in the control digesters to 4,800-6,800 mg L-1 providing process stability for food waste AD.},
doi = {10.1177/0734242X17704716},
journal = {Waste Management and Research},
number = 6,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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