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Title: Production of low-oxygen bio-oil via ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating

Abstract

Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) bio-oils with different organic oxygen contents (4-18 wt%) were prepared in a bench-scale dual fluidized bed reactor system by ex situ CFP of southern pine over HZSM-5, and the oils were subsequently hydrotreated over a sulfided CoMo catalyst at 170 bar. The goal was to determine the impact of the CFP oil oxygen content on hydrotreating requirements. The CFP oils with higher oxygen contents included a variety of oxygenates (phenols, methoxyphenols, carbonyls, anhydrosugars) whereas oxygenates in the 4 wt% oxygen oil were almost exclusively phenols. Phenols were the most recalcitrant oxygenates during hydrotreating as well, and the hydrotreated oils consisted mainly of aromatic and partially saturated ring hydrocarbons. The temperature required to produce oil with <1% oxygen was approximately 350 °C for the CFP oil with the lowest oxygen content whereas temperatures around 400 °C were required for the other CFP oils. The carbon efficiency during hydrotreating slightly decreased as the CFP oil oxygen content increased but remained above 90% in all cases, and the carbon efficiency for the integrated process was dominated by the efficiency of the CFP process. In conclusion, a preliminary technoeconomic evaluation suggested that with the current zeolite-based CFP catalysts, it ismore » economically beneficial to preserve carbon during CFP, at the expense of higher oxygen contents in the CFP oil.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1371529
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-68748
Journal ID: ISSN 0016-2361
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Fuel
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 207; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-2361
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; catalytic fast pyrolysis; hydrotreating; HZSM-5; biomass; technoeconomic analysis

Citation Formats

Iisa, Kristiina, French, Richard J., Orton, Kellene A., Dutta, Abhijit, and Schaidle, Joshua A. Production of low-oxygen bio-oil via ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2017.06.098.
Iisa, Kristiina, French, Richard J., Orton, Kellene A., Dutta, Abhijit, & Schaidle, Joshua A. Production of low-oxygen bio-oil via ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating. United States. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2017.06.098.
Iisa, Kristiina, French, Richard J., Orton, Kellene A., Dutta, Abhijit, and Schaidle, Joshua A. Thu . "Production of low-oxygen bio-oil via ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating". United States. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2017.06.098.
@article{osti_1371529,
title = {Production of low-oxygen bio-oil via ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating},
author = {Iisa, Kristiina and French, Richard J. and Orton, Kellene A. and Dutta, Abhijit and Schaidle, Joshua A.},
abstractNote = {Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) bio-oils with different organic oxygen contents (4-18 wt%) were prepared in a bench-scale dual fluidized bed reactor system by ex situ CFP of southern pine over HZSM-5, and the oils were subsequently hydrotreated over a sulfided CoMo catalyst at 170 bar. The goal was to determine the impact of the CFP oil oxygen content on hydrotreating requirements. The CFP oils with higher oxygen contents included a variety of oxygenates (phenols, methoxyphenols, carbonyls, anhydrosugars) whereas oxygenates in the 4 wt% oxygen oil were almost exclusively phenols. Phenols were the most recalcitrant oxygenates during hydrotreating as well, and the hydrotreated oils consisted mainly of aromatic and partially saturated ring hydrocarbons. The temperature required to produce oil with <1% oxygen was approximately 350 °C for the CFP oil with the lowest oxygen content whereas temperatures around 400 °C were required for the other CFP oils. The carbon efficiency during hydrotreating slightly decreased as the CFP oil oxygen content increased but remained above 90% in all cases, and the carbon efficiency for the integrated process was dominated by the efficiency of the CFP process. In conclusion, a preliminary technoeconomic evaluation suggested that with the current zeolite-based CFP catalysts, it is economically beneficial to preserve carbon during CFP, at the expense of higher oxygen contents in the CFP oil.},
doi = {10.1016/j.fuel.2017.06.098},
journal = {Fuel},
number = C,
volume = 207,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 29 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 29 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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