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Title: Full-Scale Field Test of Wake Steering

Abstract

Wind farm control, in which turbine controllers are coordinated to improve farmwide performance, is an active field of research. One form of wind farm control is wake steering, in which a turbine is yawed to the inflow to redirect its wake away from downstream turbines. Wake steering has been studied in depth in simulations as well as in wind tunnels and scaled test facilities. This work performs a field test of wake steering on a full-scale turbine. In the campaign, the yaw controller of the turbine has been set to track different yaw misalignment set points while a nacelle-mounted lidar scans the wake at several ranges downwind. The lidar measurements are combined with turbine data, as well as measurements of the inflow made by a highly instrumented meteorological mast. In conclusion, these measurements are then compared to the predictions of a wind farm control-oriented model of wakes.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Univ. of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1371522
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5000-68396
Journal ID: ISSN 1742-6588
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physics. Conference Series
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 854; Journal ID: ISSN 1742-6588
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; wind energy; wind farm; wind plant; wake steering; control; CFD simulations

Citation Formats

Fleming, Paul, Annoni, Jennifer, Scholbrock, Andrew, Quon, Eliot, Dana, Scott, Schreck, Scott, Raach, Steffen, Haizmann, Florian, and Schlipf, David. Full-Scale Field Test of Wake Steering. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/854/1/012013.
Fleming, Paul, Annoni, Jennifer, Scholbrock, Andrew, Quon, Eliot, Dana, Scott, Schreck, Scott, Raach, Steffen, Haizmann, Florian, & Schlipf, David. Full-Scale Field Test of Wake Steering. United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/854/1/012013.
Fleming, Paul, Annoni, Jennifer, Scholbrock, Andrew, Quon, Eliot, Dana, Scott, Schreck, Scott, Raach, Steffen, Haizmann, Florian, and Schlipf, David. Tue . "Full-Scale Field Test of Wake Steering". United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/854/1/012013. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1371522.
@article{osti_1371522,
title = {Full-Scale Field Test of Wake Steering},
author = {Fleming, Paul and Annoni, Jennifer and Scholbrock, Andrew and Quon, Eliot and Dana, Scott and Schreck, Scott and Raach, Steffen and Haizmann, Florian and Schlipf, David},
abstractNote = {Wind farm control, in which turbine controllers are coordinated to improve farmwide performance, is an active field of research. One form of wind farm control is wake steering, in which a turbine is yawed to the inflow to redirect its wake away from downstream turbines. Wake steering has been studied in depth in simulations as well as in wind tunnels and scaled test facilities. This work performs a field test of wake steering on a full-scale turbine. In the campaign, the yaw controller of the turbine has been set to track different yaw misalignment set points while a nacelle-mounted lidar scans the wake at several ranges downwind. The lidar measurements are combined with turbine data, as well as measurements of the inflow made by a highly instrumented meteorological mast. In conclusion, these measurements are then compared to the predictions of a wind farm control-oriented model of wakes.},
doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/854/1/012013},
journal = {Journal of Physics. Conference Series},
number = ,
volume = 854,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Jun 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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