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Title: Density functional theory studies of HCOOH decomposition on Pd(111)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Institute for Atom-efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1370182
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Surface Science; Journal Volume: 650; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: IACT partners with Argonne National Laboratory (lead); Brookhaven National Laboratory; Northwestern University; Purdue University; University of Wisconsin at Madison
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Scaranto, Jessica, and Mavrikakis, Manos. Density functional theory studies of HCOOH decomposition on Pd(111). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2015.11.020.
Scaranto, Jessica, & Mavrikakis, Manos. Density functional theory studies of HCOOH decomposition on Pd(111). United States. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2015.11.020.
Scaranto, Jessica, and Mavrikakis, Manos. Mon . "Density functional theory studies of HCOOH decomposition on Pd(111)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2015.11.020.
@article{osti_1370182,
title = {Density functional theory studies of HCOOH decomposition on Pd(111)},
author = {Scaranto, Jessica and Mavrikakis, Manos},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.susc.2015.11.020},
journal = {Surface Science},
number = C,
volume = 650,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Cited by 7
  • Here, the investigation of formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on transition metal surfaces is important to derive useful insights for vapor phase catalysis involving HCOOH and for the development of direct HCOOH fuel cells (DFAFC). Here we present the results obtained from periodic, self-consistent, density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations for the elementary steps involved in the gas-phase decomposition of HCOOH on Pd(111). Accordingly, we analyzed the minimum energy paths for HCOOH dehydrogenation to CO 2 + H 2 and dehydration to CO + H 2O through the carboxyl (COOH) and formate (HCOO) intermediates. Our results suggest that HCOO formation is easiermore » than COOH formation, but HCOO decomposition is more difficult than COOH decomposition, in particular in presence of co-adsorbed O and OH species. Therefore, both paths may contribute to HCOOH decomposition. CO formation goes mainly through COOH decomposition.« less
  • A density functional theory study of the decomposition of methanol on subnanometer palladium clusters (primarily Pd{sub 4}) is presented. Methanol dehydrogenation through C-H bond breaking to form hydroxymethyl (CH{sub 2}OH) as the initial step, followed by steps involving formation of hydroxymethylene (CHOH), formyl (CHO), and carbon monoxide (CO), is found to be the most favorable reaction pathway. A competing dehydrogenation pathway with O-H bond breaking as the first step, followed by formation of methoxy (CH{sub 3}O) and formaldehyde (CH{sub 2}O), is slightly less favorable. In contrast, pathways involving C-O bond cleavage are much less energetically favorable, and no feasible pathwaysmore » involving C-O bond formation to yield dimethyl ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) are found. Comparisons of the results are made with methanol decomposition products adsorbed on more extended Pd surfaces; all reaction intermediates are found to bind slightly more strongly to the clusters than to the surfaces.« less
  • A density functional theory study of the decomposition of methanol on subnanometer palladium clusters (primarily Pd4) is presented. Methanol dehydrogenation through C-H bond breaking to form hydroxymethyl (CH2OH) as the initial step, followed by steps involving formation of hydroxymethylene (CHOH), formyl (CHO), and carbon monoxide (CO), is found to be the most favorable reaction pathway. A competing dehydrogenation pathway with O-H bond breaking as the first step, followed by formation of methoxy (CH3O) and formaldehyde (CH2O), is slightly less favorable. In contrast, pathways involving C-O bond cleavage are much less energetically favorable, and no feasible pathways involving C-O bond formationmore » to yield dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3) are found. Comparisons of the results are made with methanol decomposition products adsorbed on more extended Pd surfaces; all reaction intermediates are found to bind slightly more strongly to the clusters than to the surfaces.« less
  • Reaction mechanisms of ethanol decomposition on Rh(1 1 1) were elucidated by means of periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. We propose that the most probable reaction pathway is via CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* on the basis of our mechanistic study: CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. In contrast, the contribution from the pathway via CH{sub 3}CHOH* is relatively small, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHOH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 3}CO* {yields} CH{submore » 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. According to our calculations, one of the slow steps is the formation of the oxametallacycle CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* species, which leads to the production of CHCO*, the precursor for C-C bond breaking. Finally, the decomposition of ethanol leads to the production of C and CO. Our calculations, for ethanol combustion on Rh, the major obstacle is not C-C bond cleavage, but the C contamination on Rh(1 1 1). The strong C-Rh interaction may deactivate the Rh catalyst. The formation of Rh alloys with Pt and Pd weakens the C-Rh interaction, easing the removal of C, and, as expected, in accordance with the experimental findings, facilitating ethanol combustion.« less