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Title: Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides

Abstract

Peptide based models for [FeFe]-hydrogenase were synthesized utilizing unnatural phosphine-amino acids and their electrocatalytic properties were investigated in mixed aqueous-organic solvents.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Arizona State University; Tempe, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production (BISfuel)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1369647
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001016
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Dalton Transactions; Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 33; Related Information: BISfuel partners with Arizona State University.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Roy, Souvik, Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D., Gan, Lu, and Jones, Anne K.. Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1039/c5dt01796c.
Roy, Souvik, Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D., Gan, Lu, & Jones, Anne K.. Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides. United States. doi:10.1039/c5dt01796c.
Roy, Souvik, Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D., Gan, Lu, and Jones, Anne K.. Thu . "Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides". United States. doi:10.1039/c5dt01796c.
@article{osti_1369647,
title = {Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides},
author = {Roy, Souvik and Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D. and Gan, Lu and Jones, Anne K.},
abstractNote = {Peptide based models for [FeFe]-hydrogenase were synthesized utilizing unnatural phosphine-amino acids and their electrocatalytic properties were investigated in mixed aqueous-organic solvents.},
doi = {10.1039/c5dt01796c},
journal = {Dalton Transactions},
number = 33,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
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