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Title: High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment

Abstract

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland, is now the highest energy accelerator in the world, colliding protons with protons. On July 4, 2012, the two general-purpose experiments, ATLAS and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, announced the observation of a particle consistent with the world’s most sought-after particle, the Higgs boson, at a mass of about 125 GeV (approximately 125 times the mass of the proton). The Higgs boson is the final missing ingredient of the standard model, in which it is needed to allow most other particles to acquire mass through the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. We are members of the team in the CMS experiment that found evidence for the Higgs boson through its decay to two photons, the most sensitive channel at the LHC. We are proposing to carry out studies to determine whether the new particle has the properties expected for the standard model Higgs boson or whether it is something else. The new particle can still carry out its role in electroweak symmetry breaking but have other properties as well. Most theorists think that a single standard model Higgs boson cannot be the completemore » solution – there are other particles needed to answer some of the remaining questions, such as the hierarchy problem. The particle that has been observed could be one of several Higgs bosons, for example, or it could be composite. One model of physics beyond the standard model is supersymmetry, in which every ordinary particle has a superpartner with opposite spin properties. In supersymmetric models, there must be at least five Higgs bosons. In the most popular versions of supersymmetry, the lightest supersymmetric particle does not decay and is a candidate for dark matter. This proposal covers the period from June 1, 2013, to March 31, 2016. During this period the LHC will finally reach its design energy, almost twice the energy at which it now runs. We will be able to study the Higgs boson at the current LHC energy using about three times as much data as were used to make the observation. In 2013 the LHC will shut down to make preparations to run at its design energy in 2015. During the shutdown period, we will be preparing upgrades of the detector to be able to run at the higher rates of proton-proton collisions that will also be possible once the LHC is running at design energy. The upgrade on which we are working, the inner silicon pixel tracker, will be installed in late 2016. Definitive tests of whether the new particle satisfies the properties of the standard model Higgs boson will almost certainly require both the higher energy and the larger amounts of data that can be accumulated using the higher rates. Meanwhile we will use the data taken during 2012 and the higher energy data starting in 2015 to continue to search for beyond-the-standard-model physics such as supersymmetry and heavy neutrinos. We have already made such searches using data since the LHC started running. We are discussing with theorists how a 125-GeV Higgs modifies such models. Finding such particles will probably also require the higher energy and larger amounts of data beginning in 2015. The period of this proposal promises to be very exciting, leading to new knowledge of the matter in the Universe.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1369630
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCR-0078
DOE Contract Number:
SC0010078
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CERN; LHC; Higgs; Supersymmetry; New physics

Citation Formats

Hanson, Gail G. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1369630.
Hanson, Gail G. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment. United States. doi:10.2172/1369630.
Hanson, Gail G. Fri . "High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment". United States. doi:10.2172/1369630. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369630.
@article{osti_1369630,
title = {High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment},
author = {Hanson, Gail G.},
abstractNote = {The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland, is now the highest energy accelerator in the world, colliding protons with protons. On July 4, 2012, the two general-purpose experiments, ATLAS and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, announced the observation of a particle consistent with the world’s most sought-after particle, the Higgs boson, at a mass of about 125 GeV (approximately 125 times the mass of the proton). The Higgs boson is the final missing ingredient of the standard model, in which it is needed to allow most other particles to acquire mass through the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. We are members of the team in the CMS experiment that found evidence for the Higgs boson through its decay to two photons, the most sensitive channel at the LHC. We are proposing to carry out studies to determine whether the new particle has the properties expected for the standard model Higgs boson or whether it is something else. The new particle can still carry out its role in electroweak symmetry breaking but have other properties as well. Most theorists think that a single standard model Higgs boson cannot be the complete solution – there are other particles needed to answer some of the remaining questions, such as the hierarchy problem. The particle that has been observed could be one of several Higgs bosons, for example, or it could be composite. One model of physics beyond the standard model is supersymmetry, in which every ordinary particle has a superpartner with opposite spin properties. In supersymmetric models, there must be at least five Higgs bosons. In the most popular versions of supersymmetry, the lightest supersymmetric particle does not decay and is a candidate for dark matter. This proposal covers the period from June 1, 2013, to March 31, 2016. During this period the LHC will finally reach its design energy, almost twice the energy at which it now runs. We will be able to study the Higgs boson at the current LHC energy using about three times as much data as were used to make the observation. In 2013 the LHC will shut down to make preparations to run at its design energy in 2015. During the shutdown period, we will be preparing upgrades of the detector to be able to run at the higher rates of proton-proton collisions that will also be possible once the LHC is running at design energy. The upgrade on which we are working, the inner silicon pixel tracker, will be installed in late 2016. Definitive tests of whether the new particle satisfies the properties of the standard model Higgs boson will almost certainly require both the higher energy and the larger amounts of data that can be accumulated using the higher rates. Meanwhile we will use the data taken during 2012 and the higher energy data starting in 2015 to continue to search for beyond-the-standard-model physics such as supersymmetry and heavy neutrinos. We have already made such searches using data since the LHC started running. We are discussing with theorists how a 125-GeV Higgs modifies such models. Finding such particles will probably also require the higher energy and larger amounts of data beginning in 2015. The period of this proposal promises to be very exciting, leading to new knowledge of the matter in the Universe.},
doi = {10.2172/1369630},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The highlight of our last budget period, June 1, 2010, to May 31, 2013, was the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), announced on July 4, 2012, and for which François Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 8, 2013. The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964 to explain how elementary particles obtain mass and was the missing piece of the Standard Model. However, the Standard Model does not describe everything that we know. There are many unanswered questions, such asmore » how can the Higgs boson have the mass that we have observed, are there more Higgs bosons, why is there more matter than antimatter, and what is the invisible dark matter, which constitutes about 85% of the matter in the universe. Our group played a significant role in the discovery of the Higgs boson and in subsequent analyses. We also carried out searches for new physics, in ways that could help elucidate some of the remaining questions. Our role in the CMS detector focused on the Tracker, a silicon strip outer tracker and pixel inner tracker.« less
  • This proposal was directed towards the measurement of Bunch-by-Bunch and Total Luminosity in the CMS experiment using Single-Crystal Diamond (sCVD) installed close to the Interaction Point - known as the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, or BCM1F detector. The proposal was successfully carried out and in February 2015 CMS installed its upgraded BCM1F detector. At first collisions in June 2015 the BCM1F was used as the primary luminometer, then in August 2015 a Van De Meer scan has been carried out and the detailed luminometer calibration is under study. In all aspects of performance measurement the upgraded detector has satisfied itsmore » design parameters and as an overview of its performance in this report will show, we have high expectations that the detector will be a powerful addition to the luminosity measurement at CMS and LHC. The proposed upgrade of BCM1F was a collaboration of CMS Institutes in Germany (DESY-Zeuthen) and the USA (Princeton) and of CERN itself.« less
  • This Final Report describes DOE-supported Intensity Frontier research by the University of Minnesota during the interval April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2014. Primary activities included the MINOS, NOvA and LBNE Experiments and Heavy Quark studies at BES III.
  • This is the final report of for DoE Early Career Research Program Grant Titled "Model-Independent Dark-Matter Searches at the ATLAS Experiment and Applications of Many-core Computing to High Energy Physics".
  • The Louisiana Tech University High Energy Physics group has developed a research program aimed at experimentally testing the Standard Model of particle physics and searching for new phenomena through a focused set of analyses in collaboration with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. This research program includes involvement in the current operation and maintenance of the ATLAS experiment and full involvement in Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades in preparation for future high luminosity (HL-LHC) operation of the LHC. Our focus is solely on the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, withmore » some related detector development and software efforts. We have established important service roles on ATLAS in five major areas: Triggers, especially jet triggers; Data Quality monitoring; grid computing; GPU applications for upgrades; and radiation testing for upgrades. Our physics research is focused on multijet measurements and top quark physics in final states containing tau leptons, which we propose to extend into related searches for new phenomena. Focusing on closely related topics in the jet and top analyses and coordinating these analyses in our group has led to high efficiency and increased visibility inside the ATLAS collaboration and beyond. Based on our work in the DØ experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, Louisiana Tech has developed a reputation as one of the leading institutions pursuing jet physics studies. Currently we are applying this expertise to the ATLAS experiment, with several multijet analyses in progress.« less