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Title: SLIM: A Big Turn for Ion Separation

Abstract

Researchers at PNNL have drastically increased the speed and separation of ions by tackling one problem: turning ions around a corner. Their technology, Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations, or SLIM, could take the form of new instruments for doctors and other applications.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369555
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ION MANIPULATION; ION SEPARATION; SLIM; IONS

Citation Formats

Smith, Dick, and Ibrahim, Yehia. SLIM: A Big Turn for Ion Separation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Smith, Dick, & Ibrahim, Yehia. SLIM: A Big Turn for Ion Separation. United States.
Smith, Dick, and Ibrahim, Yehia. Wed . "SLIM: A Big Turn for Ion Separation". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369555.
@article{osti_1369555,
title = {SLIM: A Big Turn for Ion Separation},
author = {Smith, Dick and Ibrahim, Yehia},
abstractNote = {Researchers at PNNL have drastically increased the speed and separation of ions by tackling one problem: turning ions around a corner. Their technology, Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations, or SLIM, could take the form of new instruments for doctors and other applications.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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