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Title: Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Grating and Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors

Abstract

Fiber optic temperature sensors were evaluated in the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine the accuracy of the measurements at various temperatures. A distributed temperature sensor was evaluated up to 550C and a fiber Bragg grating sensor was evaluated up to 750C. HTTL measurements indicate that there is a drift in fiber Bragg sensor over time of approximately -10C with higher accuracy at temperatures above 300C. The distributed sensor produced some bad data points at and above 500C but produced measurements with less than 2% error at increasing temperatures up to 400C

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369366
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-17-41728
TRN: US1701967
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; OPTICAL FIBERS; SENSORS; GRATINGS; FIBER OPTICS; Bragg gratings; Distributed Sensor; Fiber Optics; Temperature Sensor

Citation Formats

McCary, Kelly Marie. Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Grating and Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1369366.
McCary, Kelly Marie. Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Grating and Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors. United States. doi:10.2172/1369366.
McCary, Kelly Marie. Sat . "Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Grating and Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors". United States. doi:10.2172/1369366. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369366.
@article{osti_1369366,
title = {Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Grating and Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors},
author = {McCary, Kelly Marie},
abstractNote = {Fiber optic temperature sensors were evaluated in the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine the accuracy of the measurements at various temperatures. A distributed temperature sensor was evaluated up to 550C and a fiber Bragg grating sensor was evaluated up to 750C. HTTL measurements indicate that there is a drift in fiber Bragg sensor over time of approximately -10C with higher accuracy at temperatures above 300C. The distributed sensor produced some bad data points at and above 500C but produced measurements with less than 2% error at increasing temperatures up to 400C},
doi = {10.2172/1369366},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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