skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1369345
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-6365C
643795
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Testing held July 17-22, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Moore, David G., Sarah Stair Baylor, and David Jack Baylor. Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Moore, David G., Sarah Stair Baylor, & David Jack Baylor. Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.. United States.
Moore, David G., Sarah Stair Baylor, and David Jack Baylor. Fri . "Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369345.
@article{osti_1369345,
title = {Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.},
author = {Moore, David G. and Sarah Stair Baylor and David Jack Baylor},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Ultrasonic wave propagation decreases as a material is heated. Two factors that can characterize material properties are changes in wave speed and energy loss from interactions within the media. Relatively small variations in velocity and attenuation can detect significant differences in microstructures. This paper discusses an overview of experimental techniques that document the changes within a highly attenuative material as it is either being heated or cooled from 25°C to 90°C. The experimental set-up utilizes ultrasonic probes in a through-transmission configuration. The waveforms are recorded and analyzed during thermal experiments. To complement the ultrasonic data, a Discontinuous-Galerkin Model (DGM) wasmore » also created which uses unstructured meshes and documents how waves travel in these anisotropic media. This numerical method solves particle motion travel using partial differential equations and outputs a wave trace per unit time. As a result, both experimental and analytical data are compared and presented.« less
  • Ultrasound techniques are capable of monitoring changes in the time-of-flight as a material is exposed to different thermal environments. The focus of the present study is to identify the phase of a material via ultrasound compression wave measurements in a through transmission experimental setup as the material is heated from a solid to a liquid and then allowed to re-solidify. The present work seeks to expand upon the authors’ previous research, which proved this through transmission phase monitoring technique was possible, by considering different experimental geometries. The relationship between geometry, the measured speed of sound, and the temperature profile ismore » presented. The use of different volumes helps in establishing a baseline understanding of which aspects of the experiment are geometry dependent and which are independent. The present study also investigates the relationship between the heating rate observed in the experiment and the measured speed of sound. Lastly, the trends identified between the experimental geometry, heat rate and ultrasound wave speed measurement assist in providing a baseline understanding of the applicability of this technique to various industries, including the polymer industry and the oil industry.« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • This report outlines recent enhancements to the TDAAPS algorithm first described by Symons et al., 2005. One of the primary additions to the code is the ability to specify an attenuative media using standard linear fluid mechanisms to match reasonably general frequency versus loss curves, including common frequency versus loss curves for the atmosphere and seawater. Other improvements that will be described are the addition of improved numerical boundary conditions via various forms of Perfectly Matched Layers, enhanced accuracy near high contrast media interfaces, and improved physics options.