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Title: Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1369345
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-6365C
643795
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Testing held July 17-22, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Moore, David G., Sarah Stair Baylor, and David Jack Baylor. Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Moore, David G., Sarah Stair Baylor, & David Jack Baylor. Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.. United States.
Moore, David G., Sarah Stair Baylor, and David Jack Baylor. 2016. "Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369345.
@article{osti_1369345,
title = {Wave Speed Propagation Measurements on Highly Attenuative Wax at Elevated Temperatures.},
author = {Moore, David G. and Sarah Stair Baylor and David Jack Baylor},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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